Business
3:45 am
Mon June 24, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today comes from the Westin Hotel chain and it's: Running Concierge.

Now a hotel concierge is someone who is frequently on the run, trying to satisfy all the whims and desires of guests.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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National Security
3:45 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Snowden Case Puts U.S. In Difficult Position

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Russia's decision to allow Edward Snowden into the country as part of his around the world search for asylum has sparked outrage in Washington, D.C. New York Senator Chuck Schumer, appearing yesterday on CNN's "State of the Union," accused Russian President Vladimir Putin of aiding and abetting Snowden's escape.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "STATE OF THE UNION")

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National Security
3:45 am
Mon June 24, 2013

NSA Leaker Edward Snowden Is A Man On The Move

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

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Around the Nation
3:45 am
Mon June 24, 2013

In Chicago, Public Housing Experiment Enters New Phase

The last high rise at Chicago's Cabrini-Green public housing complex was demolished in 2011.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:25 am

The Chicago Housing Authority has torn down all of its high rises and says it's close to completing its plans to transform public housing. Now, city leaders are moving to the next part of their plan: using public housing funds not just to build homes for poor families, but stores where they could shop and work. Some residents, however, say the city is breaking a promise to provide affordable housing.

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Energy
3:45 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Can An Old Massachusetts Fishing Port Light The World Again?

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick joined state officials, clean energy advocates and union representatives to break ground for the New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal.
Jesse Costa WBUR

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 3:21 pm

A shabby old fishing port on the South Coast of Massachusetts was once known as the City That Lit the World. Its whale oil powered candles and lamps around the country.

Now, the city is trying to rekindle that flame with an alternative form of energy: offshore wind.

A Distant History Of Wealth

New Bedford's glory days are long gone. The city suffers from a long list of woes — high crime, persistent unemployment and poor public schools.

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Shots - Health News
3:45 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Proposed Changes In Organ Donation Stir Debate

Hospitals and organ banks could get more leeway in decisions about donations.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 10:55 am

The nation's organ transplant network will consider a controversial proposal Monday to overhaul the guidelines for an increasingly common form of organ donation.

The board of directors of the United Network for Organ Sharing will open a two-day meeting at the organization's headquarters in Richmond, Va., to consider new guidelines for donation after cardiac death.

Donation after cardiac death involves removing organs minutes after life-support has been stopped for patients who still have at least some brain activity.

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Shots - Health News
1:58 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Depression May Increase The Risk Of Dementia Later On

Depression is common among old people, affecting up to 25 percent.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 10:54 am

Depression can have physical consequences. Research now suggests that when people get depressed in middle age and beyond, they're more likely to develop dementia in old age.

But the link between depression and dementia remains something of a mystery. Researchers are working to understand why that occurs and what might be done to prevent dementia.

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Code Switch
1:57 am
Mon June 24, 2013

An Ever-Changing L.A. Links Walter Mosley To His Midcentury P.I.

Little Green opens in 1967 and follows Easy Rawlins' search for a young man who disappeared after visiting the Sunset Strip, seen here in 1966.
HF AP

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 10:02 am

Walter Mosley fooled us: We thought he'd killed off Easy Rawlins, the protagonist of his much-loved series. But it turned out Mosley just needed a break from the work — a long break. Six years later, in May, he came back with Little Green, possibly the best Easy Rawlins to date. Like the rest of the books in the series, it's strongly influenced by Los Angeles, the city that helped shape Mosley himself.

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U.S.
1:57 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Why The AR-15 Is More Than Just A Gun

"We've always sold more guns when Democrats are in office than we ever sell when Republicans [are] in office," says Mitch May, the general manager at Clark Brothers Gun Shop in Warrenton, Va.
Ailsa Chang NPR

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:07 am

Vice President Joe Biden and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid insist that gun control legislation is not dead — they say they're strategizing on how to bring the issue back to the Senate floor.

Even if it does return, one proposal unlikely to survive is an assault weapons ban. Military-style assault rifles now form a nearly $1 billion industry supported by gun owners who spend thousands of dollars collecting these firearms.

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World
5:24 pm
Sun June 23, 2013

Africa Trip Is Obama's Pitch To Broaden Relationships

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For more about the president's upcoming trip to Africa, NPR's Africa correspondent Gregory Warner joins us from Nairobi. Hi, Gregory.

GREGORY WARNER, BYLINE: Hi, Rachel.

MARTIN: So, as we heard Mara say, this is the trip of the first African-American president to Africa. He'll be visiting Senegal, South Africa and Tanzania. Why those three countries?

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