Middle East
4:23 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

With Rebels In Disarray, Syrian Regime Appears Confident

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:23 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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Politics
4:23 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Two Years In, A Look At Obama's Syrian Civil War Record

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:25 pm

Syria's civil war is becoming the defining foreign policy challenge of President Obama's second term.

Commentary
4:23 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Week In Politics: Immigration & Benghazi

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:23 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This week, the Senate Judiciary Committee began marking up an immigration bill. We used to speak of immigration reform, but in recent years it's become circumspect to say overhaul, which is presumably more neutral. Our Friday political commentators don't seem especially neutral about the issue. E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post and the Brookings Institution, good to see you here.

E.J. DIONNE: Good to see you.

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Sports
4:23 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Not Even Instant Replay Could Prevent These Bad Calls

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:23 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Major League Baseball has admitted that umpires have made some big mistakes in the last few days. On Wednesday, umpires ruled even after looking at television replays that Adam Rosales of the Oakland A's hit a double. The ball clearly left the park with the game on the line. And last night in Houston, umps botched a fairly simple rule about pitchers. NPR's Mike Pesca joins us now to second-guess the men in black. And, Mike, everyone makes mistakes, right, even umpires. Why are they getting picked on?

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Governing
4:23 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

After Targeting Conservative Groups, IRS Apologizes

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:23 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. After more than a year of denials by the IRS, a director at the agency apologized today for its targeting of Tea Party and patriot groups. As NPR's Peter Overby reports, the apology has reignited a political controversy.

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National Security
4:23 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

The Search Is Over: Boston Bombing Suspect Has Been Buried

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:23 pm

Audie Cornish talks to Martha Mullen, who spearheaded the effort to find a place to bury the body of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

National Security
4:23 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Benghazi Investigator Reacts To Criticism Of His Report

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. At congressional hearings this week, three witnesses introduced as State Department whistleblowers criticized the administration's handling of last September's assault on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya. That attack claimed the life of United States Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans.

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The Salt
4:11 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

How Swedish Malort Became Chicago's Mascot Bitter Drink

World Shattered, a cocktail by Tyler Fry of the Chicago bar The Violet Hour. The drink includes R. Franklin's Original Recipe Malort, and tames the bitterness with lemon, honey syrup, raspberry and mint.
Courtesy of Eden Laurin

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 5:43 pm

The people who make Jeppson's Malort, a harshly bitter spirit that's consumed in shots or cocktails, don't mind that their product makes people grimace. Instead, they celebrate it.

Carl Jeppson Co., a Chicago company, has built a minor social media empire around malort's "brutal" flavor; one winner of its slogan contest described the drink as "turning taste buds into taste foes for generations."

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It's All Politics
3:57 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Benghazi Review Leader Offered To Testify On Capitol Hill

When the House held its much-anticipated hearing on Benghazi Wednesday, one major figure not at the witness table was Thomas Pickering, the former ambassador and co-chair of the Accountability Review Board that reported on last September's attacks.

Why wasn't he there?

That's somewhat in dispute. California Republican Darrell Issa, chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, put the blame squarely on the shoulders of Pickering and report co-author Adm. Mike Mullen.

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Movie Reviews
3:47 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Polley's 'Stories': A Family Saga Strikingly Spun

A young Sarah Polley and her actor father, Michael Polley, on a long-ago day; the photo is one of many family memories that surface in Stories We Tell, a superb meditation on dramatizing memory from the director of Away from Her.
Roadside Attractions

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 4:58 am

Sarah Polley grew up the fifth of five children in a Canadian theatrical family. Her father, Michael, is a transplanted British actor; her mother, Diane, was an actress and casting director. No wonder Sarah feels her family's narrative has the stuff of drama.

"I'm interested in the way we tell stories about our lives," she says in the film, "about the fact that the truth about the past is often ephemeral and difficult to pin down."

Prophetic words, those.

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