U.S.
4:47 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

For Some Donors, Boy Scouts' Ban On Gays Doesn't Add Up

Eagle Scout Zach Wahls delivers cartons of petitions to the Boys Scouts of America national board meeting in Orlando, Fla., last May, calling for an end to anti-gay discriminatory practices. Helping to carry the cartons are Mark Anthony Dingbaum and Christine Irvine of Change.org.
Barbara Liston Reuters/Landov

Years of criticism and even a U.S. Supreme Court challenge couldn't force the Boy Scouts of America to admit openly gay members and leaders. But money talks, and after the defections of major donors, the 103-year-old organization is poised to lift its national ban.

Just last summer, the Boy Scouts reaffirmed the ban after a lengthy internal review. Several incidents since then have tarnished the organization's image and fueled an aggressive nationwide protest led by an Eagle Scout.

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Business
4:38 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Pennsylvania Outdoor Sports Show Caught In Gun Debate Cross Hairs

Gun rights advocates demonstrate at the capitol in Harrisburg, Pa., on Wednesday as vendors pulled out of the city's Eastern Sports and Outdoor Show. Vendors were upset that the organizers of the event banned the sale and display of certain types of guns.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 6:17 pm

A boycott by vendors starting this weekend at one of the nation's largest hunting and fishing shows has led to the event's indefinite postponement. Pennsylvania businesses stand to lose tens of millions of dollars in revenue.

Some 200 shops and groups pulled out of the Harrisburg, Pa., event after organizers banned the sale and display of certain types of guns.

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It's All Politics
4:36 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Why Steven Chu Was One Of Obama's Most Intriguing Choices

Energy Secretary Steven Chu tours the Vogtle nuclear power plant in Waynesboro, Ga., last year.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 4:43 pm

Of all the individuals in President Obama's first-term Cabinet, physicist Steven Chu was arguably the least likely to be found in official Washington.

The Energy Department secretary, after all, was a Nobel Prize-winning physicist from the University of California, Berkeley, the first science laureate to serve as a Cabinet secretary.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:34 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Treasures In The Attic: Finding A Jazz Master's Lost Orchestral Music

Stride piano pioneer James P. Johnson had dreams of becoming a successful symphonic composer.
William Gottlieb

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 4:13 pm

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The Two-Way
4:30 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Questions Arise About Veracity Of Iranian Space Monkey

The monkey Iranian authorities said was sent to space.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 5:21 pm

Earlier this week, we told you that Iran was claiming a "major achievement." State media reported the country had sent a monkey into space.

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The Salt
4:25 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Where's The Beef? Burger King Finds Horsemeat In Its U.K. Patties

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 7:21 pm

Burger King has acknowledged this week that some of its burgers in Britain and Ireland included horsemeat, the latest development in an ongoing scandal.

Horsemeat actually contains just as much protein and far less fat than beef, according to nutritionists.

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The Two-Way
4:21 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Reports: Secret Service Director Will Retire After 30 Years Of Service

Mark Sullivan, Director of the United States Secret Service, at a hearing of the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee in May of 2012.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Secret Service Director Mark Sullivan will retire after 30 years in service, The Associated Press and other news outlets are reporting.

Sullivan is retiring after a tough year for the agency. If you remember, 11 of its agents were involved in a prostitution scandal in Colombia.

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Middle East
4:17 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Suicide Bombing At U.S. Embassy In Turkey Kills Security Guard

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 6:17 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

CORNISH: And we begin this hour with a report on today's suicide bombing in Turkey. The target, the U.S. embassy in Ankara. The attack killed two people, a guard and the bomber. The White House called it an act of terror but had no information on the motive behind the blast. Turkish authorities identified the bomber as a member of an outlawed left-wing group. NPR's Peter Kenyon has our story from Istanbul.

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Europe
4:17 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Spain's Prime Minister May Have Received 'Black Money' For Years

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 6:17 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Swiss bank accounts, bribes, embezzlement, fraud up to the highest levels of government. Those are the headlines out of Spain this week amid allegations of under-the-table payments to top conservative politicians, including Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy. His party denies it all and Rajoy has called an emergency meeting for tomorrow.

Lauren Frayer reports from Madrid on how Spaniards are finally saying enough.

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Politics
4:17 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Republicans Divided Over Immigration Reform

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 6:17 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

No one is watching more closely how this latest immigration debate will shake out than our next guest.

Carlos Gutierrez was Secretary of Commerce during George W. Bush's second term. He went on to advise Mitt Romney in his recent run for president. After the election, Gutierrez founded a superPAC called Republicans for Immigration Reform, which gives you a sense of where he's coming from, and he supports Senator Rubio's position.

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