Middle East
3:40 am
Mon October 8, 2012

Syria, Turkey Exchange Weekend Artillery Fire

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

More Syrian mortar fire struck inside Turkey today. That's the sixth consecutive day that Syrian artillery shells have exploded across the border. The Turkish military, once again, responded with artillery fire back into northern Syria. There is a growing international chorus of calls for restraint as this cross-border fires continues, amid fears that Turkey could be dragged into the Syrian conflict. NPR's Peter Kenyon is following the story from Istanbul.

Hi, Peter.

PETER KENYON, BYLINE: Morning, Steve.

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Science
3:35 am
Mon October 8, 2012

Nobel Prize Season Kicks Off Monday

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 5:50 am

British researcher John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka of Japan have won this year's Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology. They won "for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent."

Business
3:35 am
Mon October 8, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 5:37 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is about a Washington, D.C. company stepping up to the plate for a PR pinch hit. LivingSocial is a daily discount website that competes with Groupon. It's based in Washington, D.C., and is offering a sweet deal to its hometown baseball fans.

You see, the Washington Nationals are in the Major League Baseball playoffs this year, but these games start and end late after public transit has closed. So in the past, pro sports organizations have paid deposits to keep the Metro system running overtime.

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Environment
3:35 am
Mon October 8, 2012

Scientists Watch Antarctica, Arctic Sea-Ice Levels

The ice covering the Arctic Ocean was at a record low, in keeping with a sharp warming trend in the far north. At the same time, the amount of the ocean around Antarctica covered by sea ice hit a record high. It's winter in Antarctica when it's summer in the Arctic. But why in a warming world is wintertime ice growing?

Latin America
3:35 am
Mon October 8, 2012

Chavez Wins Another Term As Venezuela's President

President Hugo Chavez waves a Venezuelan flag as he greets supporters at the Miraflores presidential palace balcony in Caracas on Sunday. Chavez won re-election and a new endorsement of his socialist project Sunday, surviving his closest race yet after a bitter campaign against opposition candidate Henrique Capriles.
Fernando Llano AP

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 8:00 am

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez has beaten his most serious political challenge in years. He defeated a young former governor handily in Sunday's presidential election. With this victory, Chavez has another six years to consolidate his socialist system in the country with the world's largest oil reserves.

It was the toughest challenge to his rule that he'd received in years — a young, vigorous candidate whose election would have ended Chavez's self-proclaimed revolution.

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NPR Story
3:12 am
Mon October 8, 2012

Baseball's Wild-Card Winners Advance In Playoffs

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 3:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. Let's review an exciting weekend of Major League Baseball playoffs. Two teams won single game playoffs to get into the full-blown playoff series that are now underway. The Yankees, Reds, Nationals and Tigers have all been winning. And if I did not just mention your team, that's because your team is now in a hole. NPR's Mike Pesca's here to help feel your pain.

Mike, good morning.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: In a hole, or out of it entirely.

(LAUGHTER)

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NPR Story
3:12 am
Mon October 8, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 5:28 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with slower growth in East Asia.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: That prediction comes from a World Bank report released today. The bank warns of a deeper and longer slowdown in the region caused by weak exports and weak domestic demand.

Business
3:12 am
Mon October 8, 2012

What's Going Wrong With China's Solar Industry?

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 3:35 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Which brings us to our next story. As Americans try again to heat up the solar industry, let's get an update on the competition. We reported last week on the West Coast solar power company that is trying to succeed where companies like Solyndra famously failed. American companies have struggled because they've been undermined by cheap imports from China. So it is meaningful to note that China's solar power industry is a mess.

We're going to talk about that with Beijing-based economist Patrick Chovanec. Welcome back to the program.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:08 am
Mon October 8, 2012

For Families Of Medicare Recipients, Insurance Choices Are Tricky

Bruce Osterweil, 59, of San Francisco has long relied on his wife's employer-sponsored health plan for coverage, but she recently turned 65 and signed up for Medicare. She's going to retire in January and now Bruce is on his own to find a plan on the individual insurance market.
Sarah Varney KFF

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 11:23 am

Bruce Osterweil is a lucky man to live just a short walk from where San Francisco's Golden Gate meets the cold, rough waters of the Pacific Ocean. He is also a lucky man to have married his wife, Patricia Furlong, who has long provided the family's health insurance through her job at a small financial consulting firm.

But last month, Osterweil's wife turned 65 and decided to retire, and although she may walk away with a crystal bowl or a golden watch for all those years of service, she will also walk away from her company's generous health insurance benefits.

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World
2:07 am
Mon October 8, 2012

Piecing Together 'The World's Largest Jigsaw Puzzle'

Roland Jahn, a former East German dissident, is now Germany's federal commissioner of the Stasi archives. His agency is painstakingly piecing together the shredded documents of the former East German secret police. Jahn is shown here in March 2011 at a former Stasi prison at Berlin-Hohenschoenhausen.
Johannes Eisele AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 3:35 am

When the Berlin Wall came down in 1989, East Germany's secret police, the Stasi, frantically tore up millions of files gathered during decades of spying on its own citizens.

More than two decades later, the vast array of secret papers collected by the Stasi is still in huge demand. So far this year, 70,000 people have applied for access to the Stasi archives.

Many are young Germans — some searching for information about relatives, others just eager to know more about their country's past.

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