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You're listening to WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. A study published in the journal "Nature Climate Change" says, the population of Emperor penguins in Antarctica is in danger. Hal Caswell is a scientist emeritus at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He co-authored the report. And he joins us from Amsterdam. Welcome.

HAL CASWELL: Thank you.

WERTHEIMER: You've been studying the Emperor penguin population in Antarctica. What's happening to them?

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Iraq is looking more and more like a country being divided into three parts. Hard-core Sunni militants have taken much of the west. Well-organized Kurdish soldiers have grabbed the north. And everywhere else, Shiites are mustering sectarian militia. Thousands of Iraqis have been killed in just the last month. NPR's Alice Fordham reports there are a lot of ideas for helping the Iraqis, but the country's newly elected politicians are not exactly rushing to address the situation.

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Iran has pledged it's support to the Shiite-dominated Iraqi government in its battle to push back Sunni-led ISIS fighters. This puts the U.S. and Iran on the same side. But American officials say Iran's efforts include sending drones to conduct surveillance. The drones are unarmed, but the military is concerned about their development. Joining us is Anthony Cordesman, co-author of "Iran's Military Forces And Warfighting Capabilities." He is an analyst with the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Mr. Cordesman, welcome.

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This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Tomorrow, Pope Francis will meet, for the first time, with survivors of clerical sex abuse. The meeting will be at his Vatican residence. His decision to meet with six European survivors comes after criticism that this pope has been slow to speak out on an issue that has severely damaged the credibility of the Catholic Church. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli is with us now on the line from Rome. Sylvia, hello.

SYLVIA POGGIOLI, BYLINE: Hello, Linda.

Argentina Squabbles Over Juan Peron Statue

Jul 6, 2014

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The election impasse continues in Afghanistan. Preliminary results are due on Monday, following an audit of ballots, but Abdullah Abdullah, who is trailing his rival, says he won't accept the results.

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On July 7, 2005 - nine years ago tomorrow - a series of explosions in central London killed 52 people and injured over 700 others. One of the bombers, Germaine Lindsay, was married to Samantha Lewthwaite, a white, working-class girl from southern England. They had both converted to Islam. Lewthwaite denounced her husband's actions after the attacks, but then her life took another mysterious turn. She left England in 2008 and moved to South Africa and from there, to Kenya.

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NPR's international correspondents cover wars, politics and global trends. But sometimes we also ask them to tell us about their lives in the field and the extraordinary people they meet. Here's a postcard sent to us from NPR's Philip Reeves in Pakistan's capital, Islamabad.

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Ever since that Canadian train derailment, first responders all across North America wonder, what if it happens here? And as NPR's David Schaper reports from this side of the border, many say they don't have the training, the equipment or the manpower necessary to respond to an oil train disaster in their cities and towns.

DAVID SCHAPER, BYLINE: The images of that fiery blast that incinerated much of Lac-Megantic's downtown last summer still haunt many first responders.

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