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The Two-Way
9:01 am
Thu November 17, 2011

White House Shooting Suspect Reportedly Hates Obama, Washington

Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Hernandez, who is in custody for allegedly firing shots toward the White House last week, "hates the president, he hates Washington, he hates society," a law enforcement official tells The Washington Post.

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Thu November 17, 2011

Solyndra Loan Decisions 'Were Mine,' Energy Secretary Chu Says

"The final decisions on Solyndra were mine, and I made them with the best interest of the taxpayer in mind," Energy Secretary Steven Chu plans to tell Congress today, as a House committee digs into the controversial $528 million in federal loans made to the now-bankrupt solar energy company.

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The Two-Way
8:03 am
Thu November 17, 2011

'A Responsibility To Represent The People:' Occupy Protest In Full Swing

Occupy Wall Street protesters gather about a block from the New York Stock Exchange.
Eyder Peralta NPR

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 1:06 pm

You could say that the real point of this march began in the past half-hour or so, as Wall Street employees try to navigate choked streets to get to work.

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The Two-Way
7:45 am
Thu November 17, 2011

Jobless Claims Decline By 5,000

There were 388,000 first-time claims for unemployment insurance last week, down 5,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration just reported.

The agency also said that the "4-week moving average" of claims — a way of gauging the trend over a slightly longer period of time — was "396,750, a decrease of 4,000 from the previous week's revised average of 400,750."

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Politics
7:30 am
Thu November 17, 2011

Automatic Cuts: Necessary Medicine Or Doomsday?

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta has warned Congress that automatic across-the-board cuts to the Pentagon's budget would "invite aggression from U.S. adversaries."
Mark Wilson Getty Images

As the congressional "supercommittee" runs out of time to reach a deficit-cutting deal, the word "sequestration" is being spoken more and more in Washington.

Depending upon the speaker's political views, the word can be spit out as a curse word, or intoned as a blessing. But love it or hate it, "sequestration" may turn out to be a word that dramatically changes the world's most powerful military, and reshapes domestic programs for public health, education, the environment and much more.

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