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11:01 pm
Mon October 3, 2011

Running The Government On Temporary Extensions

Originally published on Sat December 15, 2012 12:54 pm

The U.S. House of Representatives is scheduled to vote Tuesday on a temporary measure — passed by the Senate last week — to keep the government funded through mid-November.

"Hopefully, we can certainly avoid any shutdown talk this time," said House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va. "Get it done and continue along our mission to try and change the way spending occurs in this town."

These temporary funding extensions, lasting a few days or a few weeks, are pretty standard in Washington. Called "continuing resolutions," they go all the way back to 1876.

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The Two-Way
6:26 pm
Mon October 3, 2011

Cities Win Dubious Prize: Most Stuffy Noses

Mowing his lawn, Shane Nantz kicks up a cloud of pollen at his Charlotte, N.C., home, in this file photo from April, 2010. The city is No. 8 on a recent America's Most Congested list.

Todd Sumlin AP

Originally published on Mon October 3, 2011 6:28 pm

If mold, dust and other culprits are shutting down your nasal passages, you might find it useful to know which U.S. cities' residents have it even worse. It turns out that people living in Oklahoma City, Okla., suffer the most nasal congestion of any metropolitan area in America.

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The Two-Way
5:16 pm
Mon October 3, 2011

Shares In American Airlines' Parent Company Sink

As fears spread that American Airlines may be headed for bankruptcy proceedings, shares in the airline's parent company, AMR Corp., plummeted by 41 percent before closing at $1.98 Monday — a 33 percent drop in its value.

The stock hadn't closed below $2 since 2003, according to the Associated Press.

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Middle East
4:47 pm
Mon October 3, 2011

Hostile Crowd Forces Libyan Jew Out Of Synagogue

David Gerbi stands in front of the main synagogue in Tripoli, Libya, on Sunday. An exiled Libyan Jew, he has returned after being away for more than 40 years. He hopes to restore the synagogue and create an atmosphere of tolerance following the ouster of Moammar Gadhafi.

Abdel Magid al-Fergany AP

David Gerbi, a Jew whose family fled Libya more than four decades ago, visited Tripoli's old Jewish synagogue on Monday with big plans. He went to pray and to clean up garbage from a building long empty, though still grand with its soaring arches and butter-colored walls.

Gerbi, a 56-year-old psychoanalyst who has lived in Italy, said he had permission for the restoration from the local Muslim cleric and members of the Transitional National Council, the force that ousted Moammar Gadhafi back in August.

But two days into his effort, it came to an abrupt end.

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It's All Politics
4:34 pm
Mon October 3, 2011

What Chris Christie Can Learn From Rick Perry's Latest Travails

If he decides to enter the GOP presidential race, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie could learn a few things from fellow Gov. Rick Perry's troubles on the campaign trail.

Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 2:47 am

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie doesn't have to look far for a cautionary tale about the pitfalls of jumping into the presidential contest late, with great expectations, but little vetting beyond the relatively comfortable confines of one's home state.

As Christie continues to deliberate about entering the Republican presidential nomination fray, he has no doubt followed the supremely lousy weeks Texas Gov. Rick Perry has had since he got in, relatively late, with great fanfare, and largely untested on a national stage.

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