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The Two-Way
6:02 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Book News: 'Cazalet' Author Elizabeth Jane Howard Dies

English novelist Elizabeth Jane Howard is pictured in 1978.
Michael Fresco Evening Standard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
5:59 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Wicked Winter Storm Leaves Deadly Trail Behind As It Moves Out

Walking was the best way to get around early Friday in Brooklyn, N.Y., where snow and strong winds made driving hazardous.
Sebastian Gabriel EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri January 3, 2014 4:21 pm

The blast of winter weather that dumped 2 feet of snow in some parts of the Northeast and New England was being blamed for at least 13 deaths as of Friday afternoon.

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Business
5:55 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Cybersecurity Merger Ups FireEye's Stock Price

Originally published on Fri January 3, 2014 6:51 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with securing cyberspace.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: All right, we're talking about a $1 billion deal here. The cybersecurity company FireEye has bought Mandiant. Mandiant gained some fame last year. They exposed a secretive branch of the Chinese military that was hacking into the computer networks of over 100 multinational companies.

Iraq
5:38 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Iraq Fights To Quell Uprising By Al-Qaida-Linked Militias

Originally published on Fri January 3, 2014 6:51 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's turn our attention now to Iraq, where there's been a new bout of violence. The government there is fighting Al Qaida-linked militants who have reportedly overrun police stations and jails. Government forces have responded to this with missile strikes and ground troops. This fighting is in the country's western Anbar Province, which borders Syria.

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Africa
5:31 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Violence Welcomes New Year In Parts Of Africa

Originally published on Fri January 3, 2014 6:51 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The situation in South Sudan is, in many ways, emblematic of the troubled year the continent of Africa has endured. After two decades of democracies taking root and economies growing, 2013 brought a series of seemingly intractable conflicts: flare-ups in Mali, Nigeria, the Central African Republic and, as we've just heard, South Sudan.

To get a sense of why this is happening now, we spoke to NPR's West Africa correspondent, Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, who shared her fears and hopes for a part of the world she holds dear. Ofeibea, welcome.

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