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Environment
11:00 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Wildfires Consume Funds Flagged for Prevention

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 4:20 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Next up: wildfires. California's Rim Fire is not 80 percent contained, with some 4,000 firefighters still on the job. All that emergency response, of course, costs money, which federal government budgets for each year. But it doesn't seem to be enough, because three weeks ago, the head of the U.S. Forest Service announced that the Forest Service had burned through its firefighting budget, and would have to drain money earmarked for other things, like fire prevention.

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Animals
11:00 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Worldwide Researchers Flock to Penguin Meeting

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 4:20 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Just about everybody loves penguins, right? They're funny on land. They're amazing underwater, and they're very photogenic, so they show up in lots of ads and movies. But beyond the screen, prospects for the birds are not entirely good. This week, over 200 researches from around the world met in the U.K. to talk penguins, from the prospects of conservation of species to how penguins are able to stay under water so long, to the properties of penguin poop.

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Medical Treatments
11:00 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Alzheimer's Potential Missing Link

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 4:20 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. This is Alzheimer's Awareness Month, in case you didn't know that. Dr. Alois Alzheimer first described a type of dementia that could go on to - that would go on to bear his name - first described that in 1901. Now over a century later, more than five million people in the U.S. are living with Alzheimer's, according to the Alzheimer's Association, and we still are looking for the exact cause and treatment for the disease.

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Krulwich Wonders...
10:52 am
Fri September 6, 2013

What We Can Never, Ever Know: Does Science Have Limits?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 12:10 pm

I got two books in the mail that, if they could have, would've poked, scratched and ripped each others' pages out. I don't know if Martin Gardner and Patricia Churchland ever met, but their books show that there are radically, even ferociously, different ways to think about science. Gardner died last year. He was a science writer whose monthly "Mathematical Games" column in Scientific American was wildly popular. Patricia Churchland is a philosopher who teaches at U.C. San Diego.

The issue between them is: How much can we know about the universe?

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The Two-Way
10:51 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Antitrust Monitor Ordered For Apple Over E-Book Price Fixing

Amazon's Kindle e-reader. Apple has been ordered to submit to a monitor to ensure it doesn't fix prices on e-books in future.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 11:44 am

A federal judge who found Apple guilty of colluding with publishers in an e-book price-fixing scheme ordered the tech giant on Friday to modify its contracts and submit to oversight to make sure it doesn't happen again.

The injunction issued by U.S. District Judge Denise Cote in Manhattan against orders the iPad maker to hire an external compliance monitor for two years to supervise the company's antitrust compliance efforts, The Associated Press reports.

Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple says it plans to appeal.

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