NPR News

Pages

Animals
4:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Bill Would Keep Lead Ammunition Out Of Condors' Diet

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:22 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A bill that would ban hunting with lead ammunition in California is stirring debate. Advocates for the endangered California condor say the ban is the only way to keep the struggling species going. Some hunters question the environmental impact of lead ammunition and they say a ban would leave them with few convenient options. Here's reporter Aaron Schrank.

AARON SCHRANK, BYLINE: Inside a diagnostics room at the Los Angeles Zoo, the condor recovery team is taking an X-ray.

Read more
Law
4:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

It Will Be Up To Congress To Change Automatic Sentencing

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:22 pm

The Justice Department has called for prison sentencing reform — but it's really Congress that would have to carry it out. The time may be right: Crime is down, and even conservatives favor sentencing reform to save money.

National Security
4:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

NSA Accused Of Repeatedly Violating Privacy Rules

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:22 pm

Documents released to the Washington Post by former National Security Agency analyst Edward Snowden show the agency overstepped privacy rules.

Code Switch
4:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

The Shift In Black Views Of The War On Drugs

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is calling for major changes to the nation's criminal justice system that would cut back the use of harsh sentences for certain drug-related crimes.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 10:57 am

This week, Attorney General Eric Holder called for sweeping changes to America's 40-year war on drugs. Holder is the first African-American in the nation's top law enforcement post. He's also part of a growing movement of black leaders who have pushed for major reforms to the drug war.

Read more
Latin America
4:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Peru's Natural Gas Rush Threatens Native Tribes, Again

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 10:15 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is one of the most critical tests for a developing economy: balancing development and the protection of human rights. It's currently playing out on the national stage in Peru. Several members of the president's cabinet have just resigned over plans to expand a gas field. It's in an area populated by tribes of Indians who have no contact with the outside world. Here's NPR's South America correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro.

Read more

Pages