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Technology
4:47 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Now-Ubiquitous LED Lights Invented 50 Years Ago

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 4:13 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

They are ubiquitous. They're in our cars, our computers, our TVs and the remotes that control them. They light up our streets and, increasingly, our homes. I'm talking about Light Emitting Diodes, better known as LEDs. It was 50 years ago this week that they were invented.

NICK HOLONYAK: In a way, I knew right away from how powerful this result was that we were in the right direction.

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Economy
4:47 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Foreclosure Activity Wildly Different Across U.S.

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 4:13 pm

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The housing market may well play a role in tonight's debate and we got word today that foreclosure activity declined to a five-year low in September. The website RealtyTrac says the national average for the number of default notices, auctions and repossessions declined 7 percent month over month. Still, as NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports, that does not mean the entire country is seeing declines.

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Middle East
4:47 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Turkey-Syria Tensions High After Plane Is Diverted

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 4:13 pm

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

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Art & Design
4:47 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Satirical Art Brings Levity To London's Underground

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 4:13 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

There's a new guerilla art form in London. As Vicki Barker reports, it is intended to bring some levity to the Underground.

(SOUNDBITE OF LONDON UNDERGROUND TRAIN ANNOUNCEMENT)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: The next station is Holborne. Change here for the Picadilly line.

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Books News & Features
4:47 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Nobel-Winning Chinese Writer Inspired By Faulkner

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 4:13 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. This year's Nobel prize for literature was announced today. It went to Chinese writer Mo Yan. The Swedish academy praised what it called Mo's hallucinatory realism. As NPR's Neda Ulaby reports, Mo's work is also brutal, raunchy, funny and, unlike many Nobel literature laureates, relatively well known.

NEDA ULABY, BYLINE: Mo Yan is probably best known for writing what would become the movie "Red Sorghum."

(SOUNDBITE OF TRUMPET BLOWING)

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