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The Two-Way
10:36 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Body Exhumed Of Lottery Winner Who Suffered Cyanide-Related Death

Urooj Khan, with his winning lottery ticket. Not long after this photo was taken, he was dead.
AP

The remains of Urooj Khan, the Chicago man who last July died one day after his $425,000 check from the Illinois lottery was cut, were exhumed today, the Chicago Tribune reports.

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Opinion
10:10 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Lance Armstrong, Tragic Hero? Not Exactly

Lance Armstrong admits to Oprah Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs. The first part of the interview aired Thursday night.
Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 10:44 am

Annalisa Quinn is a freelance writer for NPR Books.

Lance Armstrong, in the interview Thursday night with Oprah Winfrey in which he admitted to doping, understood the role that storytelling played in his fall: "You win the Tour de France seven times, you have a happy marriage, you have children. It's just this mythic, perfect story. And it wasn't true."

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Monkey See
9:58 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Globes, Oscars, And Who Are You Calling A Snub?

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

On this week's show, Stephen, Glen and I are joined by All Things Considered movie critic Bob Mondello for a discussion that's knee-deep in the oddities of awards season.

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The Salt
9:51 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Mixed Pickle: The Sweet And Sour Legacy Of Dutch Trade

Pickles and herring, Amsterdam-style.
albertstraub Flickr.com

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 7:36 am

In Amsterdam, a popular street snack of brined herring comes with chopped onions and a side of sour pickle. The history of Dutch trade, too, is buried under those onions.

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Author Interviews
9:49 am
Fri January 18, 2013

The Inquisition: A Model For Modern Interrogators

An illustration shows heretics being tortured and nailed to wooden posts during the first Inquisition.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 12:41 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Jan. 23, 2012.

The individuals who participated in the first Inquisition 800 years ago kept detailed records of their activities. Vast archival collections at the Vatican, in France and in Spain contain accounts of torture victims' cries, descriptions of funeral pyres and even meticulous financial records about the price of torture equipment.

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