NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
1:45 pm
Mon December 17, 2012

Time To Talk About Assault Weapon Ban, Says 'Gun Rights' Sen. Manchin

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va.
Mike Theiler UPI /Landov

It's time to talk about both banning assault weapons and how the nation treats those with mental illness, one of the Senate's most notable "gun rights" Democrats said today.

Friday's mass shooting at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., "has changed where we go from here," West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin said on MSNBC's Morning Joe show.

Read more
Around the Nation
1:25 pm
Mon December 17, 2012

Sandy Hook Massacre Changes Gun Control Conversations

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Last night President Obama broke a long silence and called for a meaningful response to Friday's atrocity in Newtown, where a gunman murdered 27 people, including 20 first grade students, and then shot himself.

Read more
Around the Nation
1:19 pm
Mon December 17, 2012

A Tour Of A Transformed Town, From A Newtown Resident

Originally published on Mon December 17, 2012 1:54 pm

Journalist Rob Cox grew up in Newtown, Conn. and moved back after many years abroad. Cox, editor for Thompson Reuters global commentary service Breakingviews, talks about how the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School has transformed his hometown.

Around the Nation
1:13 pm
Mon December 17, 2012

The Tragedy In Newtown: The Unanswerable Questions

Originally published on Mon December 17, 2012 2:39 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. After Newtown and Tucson, Aurora and the Sikh temple, we hear a lot of answers, opinions really. Too many guns or not enough; lack of access to mental health treatment; violence in video games; violence in the movies and TV; bad parenting; lack of community spirit or lack of religion; that there's no law that can keep everyone safe from evil; that we should just enforce the laws that are already on the books.

Read more
It's All Politics
1:11 pm
Mon December 17, 2012

What Shut The Back Door To Congressional Compromise

President Kennedy speaks with Senate GOP leader Everett Dirksen of Illinois in March 1961. Dirksen's support was critical to passing civil rights legislation through Congress.
Harvey Georges AP

Originally published on Mon December 17, 2012 1:50 pm

Remember the important contributions Republicans made to civil rights legislation back in the 1960s?

They've almost been lost to memory. When Congress enacted the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the GOP presidential nominee that year, Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater, opposed it, and Republicans have never recovered their former share of support among African-Americans.

Read more

Pages