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Politics
10:34 am
Mon September 17, 2012

A Year On, What Did 'Occupy' Accomplish?

The Occupy Wall Street movement marks its first anniversary this week. Its supporters argue that it elevated the issue of economic inequality, but others say it made more noise than change. Host Michel Martin discusses the movement with author Debra Dickerson, who is still participating in protests and writes about them for Slate.com.

On Aging
10:34 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Weighing Politics At Work, Wife's Dementia At Home

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 11:03 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now, it's time to go Behind Closed Doors. That's the part of the program where we talk about things people usually keep private. And today, we want to talk about something that affects millions of people. It's dementia. It's a disease of the brain that affects mood and memory. It's most commonly associated with aging and Alzheimer's disease and it affects some five million people, according to the National Institutes of Health.

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Food
10:34 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Are You A Sellout If You Cook For Your Man?

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 11:03 am

For generations women have been told, if you want a man, learn to cook. That's exactly why feminist writer Shayla Pierce stayed out of the kitchen. But now she finds herself with a boyfriend, learning to cook, and wondering if that makes her a sellout. She speaks with host Michel Martin about her article and her change of heart.

The Two-Way
10:33 am
Mon September 17, 2012

A Los Alamos Landmark, The 'Black Hole,' Is About To Disappear

"Atomic Ed" Grothus at the Black Hole surplus story in Los Alamos, N.M., in 2008.
John Burnett NPR

It's called the Black Hole because "everything goes in and nothing comes out," as founder Ed Grothus told NPR's John Burnett in 2008.

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The Picture Show
10:29 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Same Camera, Different Century: Capturing Civil War Sites, 150 Years Later

Here's a snapshot from the field as Harrington composed his image of Burnside Bridge — which involved schlepping the huge, fragile camera down a steep incline to get the right perspective.
Claire O'Neill (@clairevoyant) Instagram

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 5:39 pm

Believe it or not, there's a lot of food involved in wet-plate photography. Egg whites (albumen) are used to make the glass plates adhesive to the light-sensitive chemicals. And one way to keep the plates from drying out after processing is to coat them in honey. It's also physically demanding, so you get really hungry.

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