Anthony Kuhn

International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn official base is Jakarta, Indonesia, where he opened NPR's first bureau in that country in 2010. From there, he has covered Southeast Asia, and the gamut of natural and human diversity stretching from Myanmar to Fiji and Vietnam to Tasmania. During 2013-2014, he is covering Beijing, China, as NPR's Louisa Lim is on fellowship.

Prior to Jakarta, Kuhn spent five years based in Beijing as a NPR foreign correspondent reporting on China and Northeast Asia. In that time Kuhn covered stories including the effect of China's resurgence on rest of the world, diplomacy and the environment, the ancient cultural traditions that still exert a profound influence in today's China, and the people's quest for social justice in a period of rapid modernization and uneven development. His beat also included such diverse topics as popular theater in Japan and the New York Philharmonic's 2008 musical diplomacy tour to Pyongyang, North Korea.

In 2004-2005, Kuhn was based in London for NPR. He covered stories ranging from the 2005 terrorist attacks on London's transport system to the wedding of Prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles. In the spring of 2005, he reported from Iraq on the formation of the post-election interim government.

Kuhn began contributing reports to NPR from China in 1996. During that time, he also worked as an accredited freelance reporter with the Los Angeles Times, and as Beijing correspondent for the Far Eastern Economic Review.

In what felt to him a previous incarnation, Kuhn once lived on Manhattan's Lower East Side and walked down Broadway to work in Chinatown as a social worker. He majored in French literature at Washington University in St. Louis. He gravitated to China in the early 1980s, studying first at the Beijing Foreign Languages Institute and later at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies in Nanjing.

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Asia
4:24 am
Wed November 27, 2013

China, Japan Ramp Up Airspace Dispute

China announced over the weekend that it had expanded an air-defense zone to cover islands that are claimed by both it and Japan. The U.S., Japan and others said they wouldn't recognize that new zone. The U.S. has since flown two bomber jets through the space without notifying China.

Parallels
11:17 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Filipino Priest Suffers With His Flock Amid Typhoon's Ruins

A makeshift headstone in the mass grave outside of San Joaquin Parish in the province of Leyte, Philippines. The Catholic parish has lost almost two-thirds of its congregation after Typhoon Haiyan swept through the area.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 7:58 am

Three young men dig a grave in a churchyard in San Joaquin Parish, a collection of about a dozen barrios outside Tacloban, the Philippine provincial capital ravaged by Typhoon Haiyan two weeks ago.

They roll an unidentified body wrapped only in blue plastic sheeting up to the grave on a squeaky trolley.

They drag the body into the pit, which is too small for it. The soft, sandy soil falls from their shovels, and in a minute, the crumpled blue figure disappears under the earth.

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NPR Story
4:01 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Old Political Feud In Philippines Fuels Rage Over Typhoon Response

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 6:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

While international relief efforts in the Philippines are in high gear, efforts by the Philippine government have been hampered. There are bitter rivalries among the country's political clans. And two major political families - including that of the president - are sparring over the response to the disaster. NPR's Anthony Kuhn has that story.

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Asia
4:52 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

U.S. Ramps Up Aid As Naval Carrier Arrives In Philippines

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 7:07 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now to the Philippines, where hundreds of thousands of survivors of last week's typhoon wait for help. Many have seen little or no aid. Government health officials there said people are living on coconut juice. U.S. efforts moved into high gear with the arrival of the aircraft carrier the USS George Washington and its support ships. NPR's Anthony Kuhn flew out to the carrier today and joins us now from Tacloban, one of the areas hardest hit.

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Asia
4:15 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Tacloban Begins To Bury The Dead As Aid Starts Coming In

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 7:39 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Nearly a week after a devastating typhoon slammed into the Philippines, the scale of the crisis is staggering. Millions of people across dozens of islands need help; that includes food, shelter and clean water. It also means help burying the dead. Some 2,000 people in the city of Tacloban are known to have died in the storm. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports on what's being done about their bodies.

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