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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Four men convicted of a notorious gang rape in New Delhi will be hanged to death, after India's Supreme Court rejected their appeals over the 2012 crime that drew worldwide attention and prompted mass demonstrations and calls to stop the harassment of women — calls that the court repeated today.

Video of a little girl running onto the playground to show off her new sports blade prosthesis has gone viral — and we'll warn you that the video may induce effects ranging from involuntary "Awwws" to spontaneous tears.

Anu, a cute and plucky 7-year-old, is at the heart of the video from BBC Midlands, which posted footage of the girl wearing her new prosthetic leg at her school in Birmingham, England, for the first time, in a version of show-and-tell on the playground.

At the same baseball game that saw Boston Red Sox fans make amends with a player targeted by racial slurs at Fenway Park, one fan reportedly used a slur to comment on a singer — and that fan has now been banned from the stadium.

"Yes, it was a racial comment," Red Sox club President Sam Kennedy said, according to the team. "It was a racial comment used to describe the national anthem that was taking place, the performance of the national anthem. It was sickening to hear."

Queen Elizabeth's husband, Prince Philip, will "no longer carry out public engagements" starting in the fall, Buckingham Palace says, announcing what amounts to a retirement at age 95.

The change will come at the end of August, according to the Royal Communications office. Until then, Philip will continue to venture out either on his own or with the queen, who is 91.

"Her Majesty will continue to carry out a full program of official engagements with the support of members of the royal family," a statement from Buckingham Palace reads.

They were left on bridges in Paris as tokens of affection. Now thousands of padlocks — many with lovers' names and messages scrawled on them — are heading to the auction block. The city of Paris says it's selling the famous "love locks" to benefit three charities that aid refugees.

The locks are being sold in nearly 200 lots, ranging from small clusters to complete fence grids from the Pont des Arts that weigh more than 1,000 pounds. To prepare them for sale, they've been mounted onto either cobblestone or wooden displays, along with a plaque that identifies their origin.

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