Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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Around the Nation
3:03 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

In West Virginia, Polluted Water Squeezes Wallets And Patience

More than a month after the Charleston, W.V., water supply was contaminated, Nakeysha Bennett will only feed her 3-week-old Eli formula mixed with bottled water. "It drives me crazy that I can't just use regular water out my sink," she says.
Brakkton Booker NPR

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 6:58 pm

Nate May's Prius is loaded down with water. The back is filled with boxes, each holding three one-gallon jugs that he just bought at Walmart. He and other volunteers are driving around Charleston, W.V., dropping off the jugs to people who have contacted his ad hoc group, the West Virginia Clean Water Hub. It's paid for with donations.

"There are a lot of people this has put in a difficult bind. Some of them can't get out, some of them are elderly, some of them — it's just too much of a financial burden," May says. "We just take them at their word if they say they need water."

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Politics
5:18 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Legislators Make A Field Trip To Investigate W.Va Spill

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 2:55 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Officials in Charleston, West Virginia, testified today that the water there is now suitable for drinking and bathing, but nobody seemed ready or willing to call it safe. The testimony came at a field hearing held by members of Congress one month after a chemical in spill in the Elk River tainted the water for some 300,000 people. NPR's Brian Naylor was there today and he filed this report.

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Around the Nation
2:25 am
Fri February 7, 2014

Post Office Could Rack Up Billions By Offering Money Services

U.S. Postal Service clerks help customers at the Los Feliz Post Office in Los Angeles.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 10:26 am

As the U.S. Postal Service continues to lose money each year, a new report suggests a way to add to its bottom line: offer banklike services, such as a check cashing card that would allow holders to make purchases and pay bills online or even take out small loans. The idea is to provide services that are now unavailable in many communities.

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Law
3:15 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

Undermanned And Limited, Chemical Safety Board Confronts A Crisis

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 6:33 pm

Transcript

BRIAN NAYLOR, BYLINE: I'm Brian Naylor in Washington.

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Law
3:42 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

New Va. Attorney General Declares Same-Sex Ban Unconstitutional

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 4:32 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Virginia's newly elected attorney general announced today that he will not defend the state's ban on same-sex marriage. Democrat Mark Herring revealed his decision this morning on NPR's MORNING EDITION. He says he wants to ensure that Virginia is, as he puts it, on the right side of history and the law. NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

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