Carrie Johnson

Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the Newscasts and NPR.org.

While in this role, Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Outside of her role at NPR, Johnson regularly moderates or appears on legal panels for the American Bar Association, the American Constitution Society, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and others. She's talked about her work on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, PBS, and other outlets.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Society for Professional Journalists and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. She has been a finalist for the Loeb award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Law
4:22 pm
Wed August 21, 2013

Manning Sentenced To 35 Years In Prison For Leaks

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 5:38 pm

Transcript

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NPR Story
10:06 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Bradley Manning Sentenced To 35 Years For Leaks

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 11:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Army Private Bradley Manning was sentenced this morning to 35 years in a military prison. The intelligence analyst shared hundreds of thousands of documents with the website WikiLeaks in what prosecutors call the biggest leak of classified information in U.S. history. The 25-year-old Manning stood at attention as his sentence was handed down in a courtroom in Fort Meade, Maryland.

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Law
3:22 am
Wed August 7, 2013

With Holder In The Lead, Sentencing Reform Gains Momentum

Attorney General Eric Holder is calling for significant changes to the way the nation deals with convicted criminals. And he's not alone.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 10:21 am

Sit down with the attorney general to ask him about his priorities, as NPR did earlier this year, and he'll talk about voting rights and national security. But if you listen a bit longer, Eric Holder gets to this: "I think there are too many people in jail for too long, and for not necessarily good reasons."

This is the nation's top law enforcement officer calling for a sea change in the criminal justice system. And he's not alone.

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Politics
3:54 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

New ATF Head Is Its First Senate-Confirmed Leader In 7 Years

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 4:48 pm

After a long delay, the Senate has finally confirmed B. Todd Jones to be the first permanent director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Firearms, Tobacco and Explosives. Who is he and what took so long?

Law
3:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Bradley Manning Acquitted Of Most Serious Charge

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 4:32 pm

A military judge has acquitted Army Pvt. Bradley Manning of the most serious charge against him — aiding the enemy — but found him guilty of 19 criminal charges including violation of the Espionage Act and theft of government property. Manning was accused of the biggest leak of classified information in U.S. history after he passed thousands of war documents and diplomatic cables to the website WikiLeaks.

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