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Eric Deggans

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Space isn't quite the final frontier for Star Trek: Discovery. Instead, the first new Star Trek series to come to television in a dozen years faced a more challenging frontier: the skepticism of all us sci-fi nerds who wanted new Trek, but were wary producers might mess the whole thing up.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Last night's Emmy Awards featured some unusual moments, including a song and dance from host Stephen Colbert.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "69TH PRIMETIME EMMY AWARDS")

It's the toughest question a Floridian has when facing an approaching hurricane:

Do I stay or do I go? If I go, where do I go? When do I leave? And how do I get there?

I've lived in St. Petersburg, Fla., for 22 years and faced the possibility of at least six hurricanes making landfall in the state. Until Irma, I never seriously considered evacuating. But Irma's massive size and record wind speed, threatened to turn my home — just a block from a picturesque canal — into a wading pool.

What, exactly, is The Orville supposed to be?

Is it, as some promotional ads on Fox suggest, an in-your-face satire of classic Star Trek-style science fiction shows – with trash-talking starship officers and a gelatinous blob of a life-form played by Norm MacDonald – crafted by the guy who created Family Guy and Ted?

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