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Joe Wertz

Joe has previously served as Managing Editor of Urban Tulsa Weekly, as the Arts & Entertainment Editor at Oklahoma Gazette and worked as a Staff Writer for The Oklahoman. Joe was a weekly correspondent for KGOU from 2007-2010. He grew up in Bartlesville, Okla., lives in Oklahoma City, and studied journalism at the University of Central Oklahoma.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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A magnitude 5.0 earthquake struck Oklahoma last night. It damaged buildings and knocked out power. As Joe Wertz from State Impact Oklahoma reports, the quake revived concerns about shaking near one of the country's largest crude oil storage hubs.

The Chickasaw National Recreation Area in south-central Oklahoma is not a national park — but it used to be. And the story of what happened illustrates a changing view of what national parks are for.

For over a century, the area's mineral-rich springs have been a gathering point for locals, travelers and tribes that were forcibly relocated to land that later became Oklahoma, says Debbie Sharp, president of the Friends of Chickasaw National Recreation Area, a nonprofit group.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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In Oklahoma, the economy runs on oil. The energy industry drives 1 in 5 jobs and is tied to almost every type of tax source. So falling oil prices have created a state budget crisis. Joe Wertz of State Impact Oklahoma sent this report.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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