Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

Lourdes Garcia-Navarro is an NPR international correspondent covering South America for NPR. She is based in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Previously, she served a NPR's correspondent based in Israel, reporting on stories happening throughout the Middle East. She was one of the first reporters to enter Libya after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising began and spent months painting a deep and vivid portrait of a country at war. Often at great personal risk, Garcia-Navarro captured history in the making with stunning insight, courage and humanity.

For her work covering the Arab Spring, Garcia-Navarro was awarded a 2011 George Foster Peabody Award, a Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club, and an Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Alliance for Women and the Media's Gracie Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement.

Before her assignment to Jerusalem began in 2009, Garcia-Navarro served for more than a year as NPR News' Baghdad Bureau Chief and before that three years as NPR's foreign correspondent in Mexico City, reporting from that region as well as on special assignments abroad.

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America, reporting from Cuba, Syria, Panama and Europe. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-Sept. 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. In 2002, she began a two-year reporting stint based in Iraq.

In addition to the Murrow award, Garcia-Navarro was honored with the 2006 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for a two-part series "Migrants' Job Search Empties Mexican Community." She contributed to NPR News reporting on Iraq, which was recognized with a 2005 Peabody Award and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton.

Garcia-Navarro holds a Bachelor of Science degree in International Relations from Georgetown University and an Master of Arts degree in journalism from City University in London.

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Parallels
1:15 pm
Wed November 5, 2014

Brazil: The Land Of Many Lawyers And Very Slow Justice

Brazil's judicial system faces a massive backlog of cases — and stacks of paperwork. One group of five judges in Sao Paulo is currently handling 1.6 million cases.
G Dettmar National Council of Justice

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 9:23 am

Brazil is teeming with law schools and lawyers. But the wheels of justice in the country turn slowly — most cases take years to resolve and sometimes even decades.

To understand why, we visited the musty offices of Judge Laurence Mattos in Sao Paulo. Mattos' suit is gray; his smile is thin. He seems as if his job has flattened him somehow. He's not very verbose either, and when he does speak, it's in a monotone. For 22 years, Mattos explains succinctly, he's been a judge dealing with financial issues in Brazil. End of story.

What is extraordinary is his workload.

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Environment
4:03 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Saving The Amazon Will Take More Than Stopping Loggers

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 5:27 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Latin America
3:36 am
Mon October 27, 2014

After Shocking Election Season In Brazil, Incumbent President Still Holds Power

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 6:32 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Latin America
3:50 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

In Brazil, Conservationists Worried New Congress Could Harm Amazon

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 5:26 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
11:11 am
Tue October 7, 2014

In Brazil, Nips And Tucks Don't Raise An Eyebrow

Janet Timal, 47 (right), stands with her niece Thairine, 21. Janet has had a tummy tuck and breast augmentation and helped her niece pay for liposuction. "The ideal is to be able to put something on, to sit down and not have your belly jumping out. Here in Brazil it gets hot, and the less clothes, the better," says Janet.
Jimmy Chalk for NPR

Originally published on Wed October 8, 2014 1:24 pm

Janet and Jaqueline Timal are 40-something-year-old sisters, and they have what they call a plastic surgery fund.

"I'm always saving money. When I see I've gathered up enough money for another surgery I do it," Jaqueline says.

She has had breast implants put in and also a tummy tuck. She's visiting the plastic surgeon's office again to do a famed Brazilian butt lift, which is the same as a breast lift, but on your backside. Janet has had a tummy tuck; she's now doing her breasts, too. Between them, they will have had five surgeries.

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