Michigan Radio: Sarah Cwiek

Sarah Cwiek joined Michigan Radio in October, 2009. As our Detroit reporter, she is helping us expand our coverage of the economy, politics, and culture in and around the city of Detroit. Before her arrival at Michigan Radio, Sarah worked at WDET-FM as a reporter and producer.

After Detroit filed for bankruptcy protection last summer, the media was flooded with stories about Chinese investors pouring money into real estate there. Headlines like this one summed it up: "Chinese investors are buying up Detroit."

The home of the Ford Model T is now an abandoned factory complex along busy Woodward Avenue in Highland Park, Mich., and there's not much to distinguish this place from Detroit's other industrial ruins.

The Detroit Red Wings are kind of playing a home game on New Year's Day — even if it'll be played about 40 miles west of their home ice in downtown Detroit.

Mike Babcock, the Red Wings head coach, told the NHL Network that might not be such a good thing, because home teams haven't fared so well in prior Winter Classics.

"The reason the home team doesn't have much success is there's probably a New Year's Eve party going on in everybody's house," he said. "So you gotta decide whether that's more important, or the game's more important."

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From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

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A 54-year-old man from suburban Detroit faces charges, including second-degree murder, in the shooting death of Renisha McBride. The case has parallels to the Trayvon Martin shooting, with a white man allegedly shooting an unarmed black teenager. But as Michigan Radio's Sarah Cwiek reports, many questions remain about what happened the night McBride knocked on the defendant's door.

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Detroit last week became the biggest city in U.S. history to file for bankruptcy. And now we're learning about some of the tough decisions that may come with that. Assuming the filing goes forward, Detroit will have to figure out how to reduce billions of dollars of debt. Creditors will, of course, push for the most money they can get, which means they're eyeing some of the city's most treasured assets. Michigan Radio's Sarah Cwiek reports.

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