Philip Reeves

Philip Reeves is an award-winning veteran international correspondent based in Islamabad, Pakistan. Previous to his current role, he covered Europe out of NPR's bureau in London.

Reeves has spent two decades working as a journalist overseas, reporting from a wide range of places including the former Soviet Union, the Middle East and Asia.

A member of the NPR team that won highly prestigious Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University and George Foster Peabody awards for coverage of the conflict in Iraq, Reeves has been honored several times by the South Asian Journalists Association.

In 2010, Reeves moved to London from New Delhi after a stint of more than seven years working in and around South Asia. He traveled widely in India, taking listeners on voyages along the Ganges River and the ancient Grand Trunk Road. He also made numerous trips to cover unrest and political turmoil in Pakistan.

Reeves joined NPR in 2004, after spending 17 years as a correspondent for the British daily newspaper, The Independent. During the early stages of his career, he worked for BBC radio and television after training on the Bath Chronicle newspaper in western Britain.

Over the years, Reeves has covered a wide range of stories - from the Waco siege, to the growth of the Internet, Boris Yeltsin's erratic presidency, the economic rise of India, and conflicts in Gaza and the West Bank, Chechnya, Iraq, Afghanistan and Sri Lanka.

Graduating from Cambridge University, Reeves earned a degree in English literature. He and his wife have one daughter. His family originates from New Zealand.

Pages

Parallels
4:46 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

How One Man's Arrest In London Shut Down Pakistan's Megacity

A Pakistani man reads a newspaper at a closed market in Karachi on Wednesday following the arrest of Altaf Hussain. For more than two decades, Hussain has wielded control over his party — and, by extension, parts of the city — from half a world away in London.
Asif Hassan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 10:09 am

The city of Karachi, on the edge of the Arabian Sea, has fizzed with life since Alexander the Great was strutting around Asia's deserts on his horse.

This chaotic and ruthless trading metropolis of more than 20 million is the giant turbine that drives Pakistan's creaking economy, providing the largest part of the national revenues.

Yet by midafternoon Thursday, Karachi's shopkeepers began hastily hauling down their steel shutters and heading home, suffering for a third consecutive day from an acute case of the jitters.

Read more
World
3:54 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Pakistani Woman Beaten To Death By Her Family As Police Stand By

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 10:16 am

Pakistan is reeling from the latest so-called "honor killing." A pregnant woman was stoned to death just feet from a courthouse for marrying a man against her family's wishes. Police stood by as family members, including a woman, took part in the killing.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

Read more
Asia
5:13 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Being A TV Anchor In Pakistan Is Fraught With Danger

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 11:57 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's turn now to Pakistan. Often the news we hear from there has to do with Taliban militants or U.S. drone strikes. But in this next story, the news is about the news. Television news anchors, to be specific - a relatively new profession in Pakistan, and one that can be unexpectedly dangerous. NPR's Philip Reeves reports.

Read more
Asia
4:17 pm
Mon May 26, 2014

At Indian Prime Minister's Inauguration, A Historic Pakistani Presence

Originally published on Mon May 26, 2014 4:43 pm

Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif was among the guests at Narenda Modi's inauguration. It's the first time the leader of one of the archrivals has attended the swearing-in of the other.

Asia
5:27 am
Mon April 28, 2014

In Pakistan, Ultra-Conservative Rivals Attack Moderate Muslims

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 9:18 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here's a vital reality about the troubled nation of Pakistan. The most common victims of Islamist extremists in that country are the extremists' fellow Muslims. Attacks by the Taliban and other fundamentalist groups dominate headlines about Pakistan yet most Pakistanis follow a different form of Islam - more moderate and peculiar to South Asia. To extremists moderation makes Muslims into targets. NPR's Philip Reeves reports.

Read more

Pages