Richard Gonzales

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

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Law
4:14 am
Mon May 11, 2015

U.S. Judge To Rule On Asylum Challenge Involving Families From Central America

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 7:27 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Law
3:34 pm
Fri May 8, 2015

San Francisco Police Texting Scandal Could Compromise Thousands Of Cases

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 9:38 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Race
1:37 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

China, India Surpass Mexico As Leading Sources Of New Immigrants To U.S.

Children attend their oath of U.S. citizenship ceremony at the Birmingham Public Library in Alabama onAug. 14, 2014.
Tamika Moore AL.com/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 2:18 pm

New data from the U.S. Census Bureau indicate a change in the flow of immigrants arriving in the U.S. from around the world and offer a look at what the nation will look like in the future.

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U.S.
2:38 am
Fri May 1, 2015

California Bill Could Limit Police Access To Body Camera Footage

Oakland police officers, wearing body cameras, form a line during demonstrations against recent incidents of alleged police brutality nationwide.
Elijah Nouvelage Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 1, 2015 11:46 am

The unrest in Baltimore and other cities regarding alleged police misconduct has prompted new calls for law enforcement officers to wear body cameras. Such recordings could provide accountability and transparency in potentially controversial circumstances.

At least, that's the idea.

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The Two-Way
7:48 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

A Ticking Clock Threatens Obama's Immigration Plan

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 12:07 pm

A federal appeals court in New Orleans heard oral arguments in a case that could determine the viability of President Obama's plan to temporarily shield more than 4 million undocumented immigrants from deportation and issue them work permits.

At stake is whether the president will get to implement his plan before his term expires.

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