Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Two-Way
2:53 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Pot Use On The Rise In U.S., Report Says

A U.N. report says the use and potency of cannabis is on the rise in the U.S.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 4:34 pm

Marijuana use in the United States has gone up as the public perception of the drug's risk has gone down, according to a new United Nations report. The potency of the drug has also increased,

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The Two-Way
1:28 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Former Senate Majority Leader Howard Baker Dies At 88

Former U.S. Senate Majority Leader Howard Baker looks to the stage during "A Century of Service" honoring him and Sen. Bob Dole at Mellon Auditorium, Wednesday, in March 2012. Baker's death was announced on Thursday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Tennessee Sen. Howard Baker, who served as Senate majority leader in the 1980s and chief of staff under President Ronald Reagan, has died at 88, his law firm said Tuesday.

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The Two-Way
7:49 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

North Korea Threatens War Over New Seth Rogen Comedy

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 7:39 am

While it's hard to imagine Seth Rogen and James Franco being the proximate cause of World War III, the stars of Pineapple Express have prompted the latest round of blustery threats from North Korea.

Pyongyang has promised "merciless" retaliation if the duo's latest comedy, The Interview, is released as scheduled in October.

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The Two-Way
5:43 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

SOS Note, Prison ID Reportedly Found In Chinese-Made Pants

An alleged cry for help from a Chinese worker, found in a pair of pants.
Amnesty UK Twitter

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 1:34 pm

When Karen Wisinska finally got around to trying on a pair of pants she bought three years ago in her native Northern Ireland, what she says she found in a pocket was a handwritten "cry for help" from a Chinese prison sweatshop.

The BBC says she posted pictures of a prison identification card wrapped in a note headlined in English "SOS! SOS! SOS!" on Facebook and got a rough translation that shocked and sickened her. She then sent the items to Amnesty International.

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The Two-Way
2:36 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Beijing Blasts U.S. Plan To Name Road By Embassy After Dissident

An undated photo provided by Voice of America shows Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, who won the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize. He was jailed in 2008 for promoting human rights. An amendment in Congress proposes renaming the street in front of the Chinese Embassy in Washington, D.C., in his honor.
AP

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 7:24 pm

Beijing is fuming over a provision slipped into a State Department budget to change the name of the street fronting the Chinese Embassy in Washington to "Liu Xiaobo Plaza," in honor of the jailed dissident and Nobel Peace Prize laureate.

The amendment, proposed by Virginia Republican Rep. Frank Wolf, would change the name of the street currently known as International Place. Wolf says it would send "a clear and powerful message that the United States remains vigilant and resolute in its commitment to safeguard human rights around the globe."

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