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Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

Prosecutors in Columbus, Ohio, have dropped criminal charges against Stormy Daniels, the adult entertainer who is suing President Trump, after she was arrested at a strip club Wednesday night for allegedly violating a law that limits touching in such establishments.

The founder of the Papa John's pizza chain has stepped down as chairman of the board after he apologized for using a racial slur about African-Americans during a conference call in May.

John Schnatter's resignation comes months after he had quit as CEO in the wake of controversial remarks concerning the National Football League's handling of anthem protests.

The Pakistani Taliban have claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing near the Afghan border that killed a secular politician and 19 others in the lead up to national elections.

Haroon Bilour, a member of the Awami National Party (ANP) was killed at an election rally in Peshawar.

Local authorities said a preliminary investigation concluded that the attack was targeted on Bilour and that "a young boy blew himself up at the main entrance of the gathering when Bilour entered the venue," Dawn newspaper reports.

The death toll from record-breaking floods in western Japan has reached at least 176 as rescue workers searched for dozens missing in hardest-hit Hiroshima and Okayama prefectures.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga announced the death toll Wednesday, The Japan Times reported. As of Tuesday afternoon, more than 50 people were still listed as unaccounted for, the newspaper said.

Soon after the last of a dozen boys and their soccer coach were rescued from a cave in northwestern Thailand, the main pump used to clear passages of floodwaters failed, forcing more than 100 rescue workers to scramble to retreat from the area.

No one was injured in the ensuing chaos, but the dramatic culmination of the successful effort to save the boys — who entered the Tham Luang cave near the Thai-Myanmar border on June 23 and became trapped by torrential monsoon rains — underscores how close to disaster the rescue came.

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