Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Two-Way
12:14 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

India Sentences 3 To Hang For Multiple Rapes

Mohammad Qasim Shaikh (right) and another accused in a gang rape case are taken to a court session last month in Mumbai.
Divyakant Solanki EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 2:11 pm

A court in India has sentenced three convicted rapists to death by hanging under a new law that seeks to crack down on attacks on women in the country.

According to Al-Jazeera, "The men are the first to be tried and convicted under a recently revised law that carries the death penalty for those convicted of multiple sexual assaults."

The news agency says:

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The Two-Way
10:51 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Scientists Say A Lake Superior Lurks On Saturn's Moon Enceladus

A photo released by NASA in 2006 shows the surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus as seen from the Cassini spacecraft.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 2:02 pm

Water, water, everywhere ...

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The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Washington Mudslide Death Toll Rises To 30

A stuffed bear sits with other items found nearby Wednesday atop a tractor that landed at the edge of the debris field in a deadly mudslide in Oso, Wash.
Elaine Thompson AP

The official death toll from last month's landslide in Washington state has risen to 30, according to local officials, with more than a dozen still listed as missing.

The Snohomish County medical examiner's office released the names of two more victims: 67-year-old Gloria Halstead and 13-year-old Jovon E. Mangual, both of Arlington. Of the 30 confirmed victims, three have yet to be identified.

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The Two-Way
10:34 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Court In Turkey Orders Twitter Service Restored

A Twitter app on an iPhone screen. Turkey banned the social media service for two weeks, but a court has now ordered the ban lifted on constitutional grounds.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 12:51 pm

Twitter is back on in Turkey after a constitutional court ruled that a government-imposed ban on the social media service was a breach of free expression.

The country's telecom authority lifted the 2-week-old ban, after it was blocked in the runup to last Sunday's local elections.

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The Two-Way
6:11 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

U.S. Troubled By Iran's Choice Of 1979 Hostage-Taker For U.N. Post

The U.S. says Iran's potential nomination of a new United Nations ambassador who was a hostage-taker during the 1979 takeover of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran is "extremely troubling," but stopped short of saying it would deny him a visa.

"We're taking a close look at the case now, and we've raised our serious concerns about this possible nomination with the government of Iran," State Department deputy spokesman Marie Harf said of Hamid Aboutalebi, who was a member of a radical Muslim student group who seized the took over the embassy and held 52 Americans hostage for 444 days.

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