Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson

International correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is based in Berlin and covers Central Europe for NPR. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning programs including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

She was previously based in Cairo and covered the Arab World for NPR from the Middle East to North Africa. Nelson returns to Egypt on occasion to cover the tumultuous transition to democracy there.

In 2006, Nelson opened the NPR Kabul Bureau. During the following three and a half years, she gave listeners in an in-depth sense of life inside Afghanistan, from the increase in suicide among women in a country that treats them as second class citizens to the growing interference of Iran and Pakistan in Afghan affairs. For her coverage of Afghanistan, she won a Peabody Award, Overseas Press Club Award and the Gracie in 2010. She received the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award from Colby College in 2011 for her coverage in the Middle East and Afghanistan.

Nelson spent 20 years as newspaper reporter, including as Knight Ridder's Middle East Bureau Chief. While at the Los Angeles Times, she was sent on extended assignment to Iran and Afghanistan following the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. She spent three years an editor and reporter for Newsday and was part of the team that won the 1997 Pulitzer Prize for covering the crash of TWA Flight 800.

A graduate of the University of Maryland, Nelson speaks Farsi, Dari and German.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Germany may appear welcoming to refugees who are coming here these days, but in reality, the government is pretty picky about who gets to stay.

At least half don't get the green light, including a group of asylum seekers from Afghanistan and Iran who set up a protest tent in downtown Nuremberg to draw attention to their plight.

They say they fled war and persecution, but their claims for asylum were rejected, in part because where they come from doesn't top the list of countries Berlin considers at war or oppressive.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Hungary is also trying persuasion. If you're approaching Hungary's border hoping to migrate through the country to points north, you are liable to see a billboard with a discouraging message.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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