WMHT-FM: Marie Cusick

Marie Cusick is the WMHT/Capital Region reporter for the Innovation Trail and New York NOW.

She contributes television, radio, and digital reports to public stations throughout the state. Her television reports can be seen on New York NOW and on WNET Thirteen's New York City public television show, MetroFocus.

Her radio work has appeared nationally on NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition and regionally on WNYC.

Marie joined WMHT from her hometown of Lancaster, Pennsylvania where she was a general assignment reporter for a cable TV news station. She previously worked as an anchor and reporter for the ABC affiliate in Casper, Wyoming. She began her broadcasting career on the assignment desk at WBZ-TV in Boston.

The U.S. is one of the only countries in the world that lets private individuals own the minerals under their land, a policy that dates to the Founding Fathers as they sought to elevate private interests over those of the British Crown. This financial incentive to allow new drilling goes a long way in explaining the nation's natural gas boom. The National Association of Royalty Owners estimates some 12 million American landowners receive royalties for the exploitation of oil, gas and other mineral resources under their property.

Lancaster County, Pa., is well known for its pastoral landscape, Amish community, and agricultural heritage. Despite this reputation, few local chefs have embraced the farm-to-table concept until recently.

A restaurant called John J. Jeffries, in Lancaster City, was among the first. Although the menu changes seasonally, customers can order the restaurant's version of steak tartare year-round.



Now to another part of the country that's seeing a lot of new drilling, thanks to fracking, that's Pennsylvania. Some landowners there are upset about royalties. They claim they're being cheated out of payments by one of the country's biggest natural gas companies.

Marie Cusick of member station WITF in Harrisburg tells us more.

Three years ago, a report from the National Academy of Sciences exposed serious problems in the nation's forensic science community. It found not only a lack of peer-reviewed science in the field, but also insufficient oversight in crime laboratories.

Little has changed since that report came out, but concerns are growing as scandals keep surfacing at crime labs across the country.

Critical Errors

The New York state capital, Albany, is a gathering place for the state's most powerful people.

But in the city's poor and predominately black South End neighborhood, many residents once felt powerless.

They had repeatedly asked for better public transit for South End, an area plagued with poverty and crime not far from New York's gated governor's mansion.

Today, the city's Route 100 bus glides easily up Morton Avenue, a steep hill in the South End neighborhood. Many feel there would be no Route 100 if not for the efforts of local resident Willie White.