All Things Considered on KCCU-HD2

Mon-Fri at 6:00 PM on HD2
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, Audie Cornish

All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations at 5:00pm on May 3, 1971.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

Credit Doby Photography/NPR

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The Salt
4:05 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

In Kazakhstan, No Horror At Horse Meat

Signs advertise the type of meat sold in each section of the Green Market in Almaty, Kazakhstan.
Sly06/Flickr

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:24 pm

Though the thought of horse meat in British lasagna or Ikea meatballs may be stomach-churning to some people, in some cultures the practice of eating horse meat is not just acceptable, it's a treat. NPR's Peter Kenyon just returned from the Central Asian republic of Kazakhstan and checked out the meat market at the Green Bazaar in Almaty.

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All Tech Considered
3:41 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Street Lights, Security Systems And Sewers? They're Hackable, Too

An analyst works at a federal cybersecurity center in Idaho in 2011. Experts say Internet-connected infrastructure is a possible target of cyberwarfare.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:05 pm

Allegations that the Chinese military has been hacking U.S. corporations are raising tensions. But in the case of a full-fledged cyberwar, things would look very different.

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NPR Story
3:41 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Obama's Second Term Cabinet Nears Completion With New Nominations

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 4:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

Three new faces joined President Obama today at the White House.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Today, I'm announcing my plan to nominate three outstanding individuals to help us tackle some of our most important challenges.

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Music Reviews
2:40 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Latin Gold In The Frozen North At Toronto's Lula Lounge

Jane Bunnett's "Ron Con Ron" is featured on Lula Lounge: Essential Tracks.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 4:34 pm

For years, Canada has welcomed waves of newcomers from Latin America and the Caribbean. A thriving music scene has grown out of this migration — like the one at Lula Lounge, a nightclub in a working-class neighborhood of Toronto. The club's co-founder, Jose Ortega, cut his teeth in New York's legendary Latin scene. When he came to Toronto, he found the vibe fresher, more open to experimentation. And he found talent. It was just a matter of time before the country produced great Latin bands.

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Education
3:20 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

Teaching 2.0: Is Tech In The Classroom Worth The Cost?

Students at Westlake High School in Waldorf, Md., participate in an interactive digital conversation with historian Kenneth C. Davis about late 19th and early 20th century American history on Thursday. The school uses a state of the art "telepresence center" for students to connect with experts all over the world.
NPR Celeste Headlee

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 4:05 pm

The hallways at Westlake High School in Maryland are just like thousands of other school hallways around the country: kids milling around, laughing and chatting on their way to class.

On a recent morning, about 30 kids took their seats in a classroom that initially seems like any other. The major difference here is that instead of a chalkboard and a lectern at the head of the class, there are two enormous flat-panel screens and thin, white microphones hanging in four rows across the ceiling.

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