All Things Considered on KCCU-HD2

Mon-Fri at 6:00 PM on HD2
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, Audie Cornish

All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations at 5:00pm on May 3, 1971.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

Credit Doby Photography/NPR

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Law
4:52 pm
Tue July 3, 2012

Did The Chief Justice 'Evolve' On Health Care?

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 5:57 pm

Chief Justice John Roberts has been called to task by conservatives for siding with the more liberal justices to uphold President Obama's health care law. This week a CBS reporter said Roberts switched his views after at first siding with conservatives. Justices sometimes change their minds after the initial conference on a case as they circulate draft opinions, consult with colleagues and think about the issues. What's unusual was the leak which was an apparent attempt to undermine the chief justice. Nina Totenberg talks to Robert Siegel.

Latin America
4:16 pm
Tue July 3, 2012

Colombia Relives Escobar's Reign Of Terror, On TV

The TV series Pablo Escobar: Boss of Evil, starring Andres Parra as the eponymous Colombian drug lord, is revisiting a dark period in the country's history.
Caracol Television

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 7:21 pm

A generation ago, he terrorized Colombia with a wave of bombings and assassinations that nearly brought the state to its knees.

Now, nearly 20 years after Pablo Escobar was shot dead following a long manhunt by Colombian and American agents, the flamboyant chief of the Medellin cocaine cartel is being resurrected by Colombian television.

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PG-13: Risky Reads
3:48 pm
Tue July 3, 2012

Bordellos, Bandits And One Big Mississippi Adventure

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Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 6:06 pm

W. Ralph Eubanks is the author of Ever Is a Long Time and The House at the End of the Road. He is director of publishing at the Library of Congress.

The work of William Faulkner looms as a mountain too high to climb for many readers, with his long, complex sentences and shifting point of view. But Faulkner's famously tangled mix of literary techniques meant nothing when I was about 12 years old and picked up a copy of The Reivers.

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Health
3:19 pm
Tue July 3, 2012

Is An AIDS-Free Generation Within Reach?

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 6:06 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

More now on the new era of AIDS. Joining us is Ambassador Eric Goosby. He's the head of PEPFAR, the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. That's the U.S.'s initiative to help HIV-AIDS patients around the globe. Ambassador Goosby, welcome to the program.

ERIC GOOSBY: Thank you.

SIEGEL: And first, is that rather encouraging story that Dick Knox just reported about Haiti, is it typical of what's happening in other developing countries? Is Haiti a successful outlier or around the medium? What would you say?

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Health
3:04 pm
Tue July 3, 2012

Treating HIV: From Impossible To Halfway There

Francois St. Ker, 55, was on the brink of dying from AIDS in the spring of 2001. Today, he's a successful farmer and is in good health, thanks to treatment for his HIV.
John Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 1:20 pm

This story begins 11 years ago. It was a time when many, if not most, experts said it was unthinkable to treat people with AIDS in developing countries using the triple-drug regimens that were routinely saving the lives of patients in wealthier countries.

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