All Things Considered on KCCU

Mon-Fri at 4:00 PM
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, Audie Cornish
Clinton Wieden

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

Credit NPR/Doby Photography

Local Host(s): 
Clinton Wieden
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Music Interviews
9:44 am
Sun January 8, 2012

Deathbed Music: The Final Works of Famous Composers

A 1791 painting Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on his deathbed, surrounded by his wife and friends.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

When it comes to last words, there's a kind of poetry in even the oddest ones. Oscar Wilde hated the wallpaper in the room where he died: "One of us has to go," he muttered. Salvador Dali: "Where is my clock?" Steve Jobs: "Oh wow, oh wow, oh wow," according to his sister, who was in the room.

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Author Interviews
3:59 pm
Sat January 7, 2012

'Man In The Middle': Between Faith And Politics

Timothy Goeglein (left) spent nearly eight years in the White House as President George W. Bush's key point of contact to American conservatives and the faith-based world and was often profiled in the national news media.
B&H Publishing Group

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 9:08 am

Tim Goeglein worked in the George W. Bush White House for eight years, and it was in the Oval Office that the president forgave him.

While working as an aide to Bush, Goeglein repeatedly plagiarized columns he sent to his hometown newspaper under his byline. When his actions were discovered, he went to Bush to apologize, fully expecting to be fired.

"Before I could get barely a few words out," he says, "he looked at me, and he said, 'Tim, grace and mercy are real. I have known grace and mercy in my life, and I'm extending it to you. You're forgiven.' "

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Music Interviews
3:26 pm
Sat January 7, 2012

Kelly Clarkson: A Pop Star Survives

Kelly Clarkson's new album is Stronger.
Harper Smith Courtesy of the artist

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Music Interviews
3:14 pm
Sat January 7, 2012

Frampton's Dream Guitar, Recovered Decades Later

Frampton poses with the guitar he thought he'd lost forever.
Courtesy Gregg Roth

Originally published on Sun January 8, 2012 8:03 am

Peter Frampton sold millions of records with the help of a customized Gibson guitar. Three decades ago, that guitar was destroyed in a plane crash ... or so he thought.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri January 6, 2012

U.S. Navy Ship Saves Iranians From Pirates

Originally published on Fri January 6, 2012 4:58 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now, a story with this you-can't-make-it-up headline: Americans Rescue Iranian's From Pirates. According to the U.S. Navy, yesterday in the North Arabian Sea, a Navy battle group came across a fishing vessel in distress. The crew was Iranian and they'd been held hostage for weeks by pirates. And here's the irony: The American battle group included the same aircraft carrier that Iran's government threatened earlier this week.

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