All Things Considered on KCCU

Mon-Fri at 4:00 PM
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, Audie Cornish
Clinton Wieden

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

Credit NPR/Doby Photography

Local Host(s): 
Clinton Wieden
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U.S.
4:52 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Assisted Suicide Goes To Vote In Massachusetts

John Kelly and Dr. Marcia Angell are advocates on opposite sides of the issue of physician-assisted suicide.
Jesse Costa WBUR

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 4:09 pm

Two states, Oregon and Washington, have legalized physician-assisted suicide through voter-approved ballot initiatives. Massachusetts will become the third if voters approve the so-called Death With Dignity ballot question. The measure would let terminally ill patients with six months or less to live get a lethal prescription. The outcome of that vote could change the landscape for legalized suicide nationwide.

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Music Interviews
3:39 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Gary Clark Jr.: A Blues Wunderkind Grows Up, Breaks Out

Gary Clark Jr.'s new album is called Blak and Blu.
Frank Maddocks Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 8:05 am

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Africa
3:39 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

In A Tanzanian Village, Elephant Poachers Thrive

Poaching is rife in Tanzania game reserves. This elephant was killed, and its tusks taken, at the Lake Chala Safari Camp, a small, private reserve near Mount Kilimanjaro in northern Tanzania.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 7:16 pm

An insatiable demand for ivory in Asia is fueling a massive slaughter of elephants across Africa. As NPR's John Burnett reports, one of the worst poaching hot spots is Tanzania. In this story, he visits an ivory poacher's town that sits next to a major game reserve.

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The Salt
3:39 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Beef Heart: An Unexpected Meal That Spans Generations

The Bristol's Beef Heart
Jody Eddy

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 5:43 pm

Beef heart — it's what's for dinner! Well, if you're not a vegetarian. Stick with us on this.

All Things Considered is launching a Found Recipe series Thursday, asking cookbook authors, chefs and bloggers to tell us about the dishes that surprise and delight. These are recipes stumbled upon or created by accident or by necessity.

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Europe
2:09 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

While Spain Struggles, The Basque Region Shines

The Basque region has a long and rich industrial tradition. Here is a CAF factory in Beasain, Spain.
Lauren Frayer for NPR

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 5:51 pm

For decades, most of the news out of Basque country was horrible. Since the late 1960s, this region in northern Spain has been infamous as home to the ETA separatist group, which killed more than 800 people while fighting for Basque independence from Madrid.

But two years ago, the separatist group declared a final cease-fire and the attacks have stopped. Now the country is becoming known for something else: its booming economy.

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