All Things Considered on KCCU

Mon-Fri at 4:00 PM
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, Audie Cornish
Clinton Wieden

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

Credit NPR/Doby Photography

Local Host(s): 
Clinton Wieden
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182890ae1c8782104877dd9|518288ffe1c8782104877dcb

Pages

Opinion
1:22 pm
Fri April 27, 2012

For Baseball Fans, May the Force Be With You

Baseball's 10th player: you, on your couch, willing a win.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 5:05 pm

Hart Seely is the author of The Juju Rules: Or, How to Win Ballgames from Your Couch: A Memoir of a Fan Obsessed.

Remember that pod on the Death Star, where Darth Vader would go to be alone? Did you ever wonder what he was doing in there?

Well, I have a theory: I think he was watching ballgames.

The new baseball season is here. For me, it means reclaiming the war pod, the living room — or, as I prefer to call it: my personal corporate luxury skybox.

Read more
You Must Read This
4:41 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

Bradbury's Tale: A 'Wicked' Read, A Haunted Book

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter." href="/post/bradburys-tale-wicked-read-haunted-book" class="noexit lightbox">
Seth Grahame-Smith is the author of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.
Matthew Rudenberg

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 5:27 pm

Seth Grahame-Smith is the author of Unholy Night.

I know it's strange to be thinking about October right now, but whenever I write, in a way that's always where I am. Growing up in Connecticut, it always held a special place in my heart — "a rare month for boys," as Ray Bradbury begins Something Wicked This Way Comes.

Read more
NPR Story
3:35 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

Victims Find Justice After Liberian Leader Is Charged

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 5:27 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

When Charles Taylor was first indicted, his trial was set to take place at the special court of Sierra Leone in Freetown, but the young government there expressed concern that the trial could destabilize the nation's fragile peace, so it was moved to The Hague. Today, though, the special court in Sierra Leone hosted a live broadcast of the verdict. NPR's Susannah George was there. She sent this report.

Read more
The Record
1:27 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

Marooned In L.A. For A Week, Coachella Bands Make Do

Ian St. Pe of the band Black Lips performs at this year's Coachella festival in Indio, Calif. Like many of the artists on the bill, the band agreed not to book other shows in Southern California within months of the event.
Michael Buckner Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:51 am

The massive Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival came to a close in California on Sunday after two weekends worth of sold-out shows by over 150 artists.

One of those acts was the Austin, Texas, band Explosions in the Sky, which first played Coachella back in 2007 and has seen its profile grow since then.

Read more
Law
7:25 pm
Wed April 25, 2012

Immigration Brings High Drama To The High Court

This artist rendering shows Solicitor General Donald Verrilli speaking before the Supreme Court. Verrilli argued Wednesday that Arizona's immigration law steps into federal territory.
Dana Verkouteren AP

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 7:53 am

A majority of U.S. Supreme Court justices signaled Wednesday that they will uphold at least part of Arizona's controversial immigration law. Four provisions of the law were blocked by a federal appeals court last year, and while even some of the court's conservatives expressed skepticism about some of those provisions, a majority seemed willing to unblock the so-called "show me your papers" provisions.

Read more

Pages