All Things Considered on KCCU

Mon-Fri at 4:00 PM
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, Audie Cornish
Clinton Wieden

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

Credit NPR/Doby Photography

Local Host(s): 
Clinton Wieden
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Composer ID: 
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American Dreams: Then And Now
4:11 pm
Thu June 14, 2012

Nailing The American Dream, With Polish

A model shows off an ABC student's work. Most of the students are studying manicuring.
Courtesy of Advance Beauty College

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 7:25 pm

If you've had a manicure in California, odds are the person at the other end of the emery board was of Vietnamese heritage.

Vietnamese immigrants now dominate California's nail-care industry — and make up a significant percentage of all manicurists nationwide.

The story began with a hurried immigration after the fall of Saigon almost four decades ago.

Sparked by the interest of a group of refugees and the help of a Hollywood star, the demand for affordable manicures quickly became the foundation of the American dream for many Vietnamese newcomers.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:53 pm
Thu June 14, 2012

Can A Colon Cancer Test Level The Playing Field For Native Alaskans?

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 7:56 pm

Alaska Natives are twice as likely to get colon cancer and die from it as the white population in the United States. When Mayo Clinic doctor David Ahlquist took a trip to Bethel, Alaska, in the mid-1990s, that startling statistic caught his attention.

"Here they had one of the world's highest rates of colon cancer and one of the world's poorest outcomes in terms of survival from cancer, because of late diagnosis," Ahlquist says.

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Food
3:25 pm
Thu June 14, 2012

Mozambique Farmland Is Prize In Land Grab Fever

Young boys thresh soybeans by hand in Ruasse.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 2:37 pm

First of a two-part series. Read part 2.

In these days of financial uncertainty, the hot new investment tip is farmland.

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Poetry
3:04 pm
Thu June 14, 2012

NewsPoet: Robert Pinsky Writes The Day In Verse

Robert Pinsky visits NPR headquarters in Washington D.C., on Thursday.
Ebony Bailey NPR

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 10:18 am

Today at All Things Considered, we continue a project we're calling NewsPoet. Each month, we bring in a poet to spend time in the newsroom — and at the end of the day, to compose a poem reflecting on the day's stories.

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Recipes
3:03 pm
Thu June 14, 2012

Walnut Meringue Cookies Sealed With A 'Kiss'

Listener Jamie Lynn Stevenson's "lost" recipe for walnut meringue cookies was passed down from her great-grandmother Rosina Richardt.
Courtesy of Jamie Lynn Stevenson

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 2:04 pm

Jamie Lynn Stevenson can still remember the smell of walnut meringue cookies wafting from her great-grandmother's kitchen. The "little piles of heaven," also known in her family as bussels, or "kisses" in German, were dense but chewy, with hints of caramelized nut flavor inside.

"I was just salivating waiting for them," Stevenson recalls. "And the great thing about these cookies is that they didn't take very long to bake!"

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