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Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices, including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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NPR Story
4:04 am
Tue December 31, 2013

American Dialect Society To Vote On Word Of The Year

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 6:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's that time again, the American Dialect Society will soon vote on its Word of the Year. Last year it was hashtag. For this year's words that popped, we reached the society's new words guy, linguist Ben Zimmer.

Good morning.

BEN ZIMMER: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: So this year it seems that everyone is coalescing around one word. That word is selfie. It's so ubiquitous that I wonder if that is one of your top words.

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NPR Story
4:04 am
Tue December 31, 2013

10,000 Year Clock Challenges Approach To Time

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 7:56 am

In this final interview in our series of conversations about the future, Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep talks to Danny Hillis, a scientist and engineer and the inventor of a clock designed to last 10,000 years. The clock is meant to encourage people to think about the long-range future; the "long now" as Hillis calls it.

NPR Story
4:04 am
Tue December 31, 2013

Syria To Miss Deadline To Remove Chemical Weapons Stockpile

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 6:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne. This New Year's Eve is also a deadline in one of the year's biggest stories. Syria is due to turn over more than 500 tons of some its most deadly materials in its stockpile of chemical weapons. That was part of the deal brokered with the Assad regime by the U.S. and Russia, after a chemical attack outside Damascus killed many hundreds of civilians. But the Syrian government will not meet today's deadline.

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It's All Politics
6:20 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Assessing Bloomberg's Legacy Is A Complex Task

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks at the opening of the New York Genome Center on Sept. 19 in New York City.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 10:16 am

At the end of this month, Michael Bloomberg ends his three terms as mayor of New York City. Assessing Bloomberg's legacy, a man who went from Republican to Independent, is not a simple thing to do. His 12 years in office were groundbreaking, locally and even globally.

But at the same time, many New Yorkers found him arrogant and insensitive to the poor. It's a vein that was tapped successfully by Democratic Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio, who described New York as a city of haves and have nots. But the changes implemented by Bloomberg will impact generations of New Yorkers to come.

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Around the Nation
5:07 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Crushed Strawberry Won't Ruin Harrisburg's New Year

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 6:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Nothing says New Year like the giant sparkling ball lowered in Times Square. Still, other cities have other traditions. In Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, they drop a giant strawberry. And this year, that tradition went splat. In a test drop last Friday, a malfunction sent the big fiberglass strawberry plunging three stories, shattering on the sidewalk. They're now rushing to get a new strawberry ready for the New Year. That's tomorrow. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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