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Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices, including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Asia
7:15 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Tacloban Took Brunt Of Typhoon Haiyen

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We have two perspectives now on the destruction a typhoon left behind in the Philippines. The first is the view from the air. It comes from U.S. Marine Brigadier General Paul Kennedy, who is coordinating an American military effort to help typhoon survivors. Not long ago, General Kennedy stepped on board a helicopter for what he called reconnaissance. He flew over a wide strip of land struck by one of the strongest storms on record.

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Around the Nation
6:44 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Knish Makers To Be Back In Business By Hanukkah

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with an update on the knish shortage. A factory on New York's Long Island produces the Jewish pastry, often stuffed with potatoes. A fire in September disrupted production. The AP quotes a Knish fan saying, My heart is broken. Now the knish makers say they'll be back in production by the start of Hanukah. In the meantime, a chef at Katz's Delicatessen in Manhattan says of the shortage, quote: Get over it. Get a life. It's just a knish. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Books News & Features
6:36 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Agatha Christie's Lost 1954 Work Sold As eBook

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:15 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer.

A long lost work by Agatha Christie goes on sale today as an e-book. In 1954, Christie wrote "Hercules Poirot and the Green Shore Folly" to help her church raise funds for stained glass windows. It's about a parlor game of murder. The book is filled with references to local places and even to Christie's home, perhaps clues about her life. We'll all have to engage those little gray cells.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Middle East
4:14 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Israel Joins Debate Over Nuclear Talks With Iran

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 7:22 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Asia
4:14 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Typhoon Devastates Leyte Province

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:15 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Let's get some perspective now on the destruction in the Philippines.

WERTHEIMER: Almost any death toll we might give today would be unreliable. But we do know that hundreds of thousands of people who survived the storm are now living without shelter. They now face the challenge of finding basics like food and water.

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