Morning Edition on KCCU-HD2

Mon-Fri at 4:00 AM on HD2
Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices, including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182893de1c875d5524eadf8|518288ffe1c8782104877dcb

Pages

The Record
6:42 am
Mon April 22, 2013

The Ghostface Killah Rises Again

Adrian Younge (left) and Ghostface onstage at the Seattle stop of their tour last week.
Erich Donaldson

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 1:26 pm

Read more
NPR Story
4:55 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Explosion Fails To Divide Texas Community

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's check in on another major story that dominated our attention last week, a fertilizer plant that caught fire and exploded in Texas. We can now say that 14 people were killed and 200 injured. But those numbers alone do not quite capture the impact of this disaster.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

To understand that, recall that the disaster with that scale came in a city of fewer than 3,000 people.

NPR's John Burnett reports from West.

Read more
NPR Story
4:55 am
Mon April 22, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now solar power has had its problems in recent decades. For years, solar panels were too expensive to compete. More recently, as we heard earlier in the business news, solar panels got so cheap that manufacturers ran into trouble. But solar energy had a signal achievement in March, and that is our last word in business today.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
4:55 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Rap Genius Annotates Song Verses

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK, lets meet a couple of guys who are big fans of Ghostface Killah.

MAHBOD MOGHADAM: The best Ghostface song, I think, is " Nutmeg." That's all of his...

GREENE: That's Mahbod Moghadam. He and his friend Tom Lehman co-founded a Web site called Rap Genius.

MOGHADAM: Tom is here looking up...

TOM LEHMAN: These are my favorite lines of Ghost. It's from "Buck 50," where he says: supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, docialiexpilisticfragicalsuper Wu-Tang Chamber. Cancun catch me in the a room eating grouper...

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:28 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Scammers Find Fertile Ground In Health Law

Confusion over the details of the new health care law is leaving many people vulnerable to con artists. Evelyne Lois Such, 86, was recently the target of an attempted scam.
Matt Nager for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:18 am

One recent morning, Evelyne Lois Such was sitting at her kitchen table in Denver when the phone rang. Such, who's 86, didn't recognize the phone number or the deep voice on the other end of the line.

"He asked, 'Are you a senior?' and I said yes, and he said, 'Well, we are sending out all new Medicare cards, and I want to make sure I have all your statistics just correct,' " Such recalls.

Read more

Pages