Morning Edition on KCCU-HD2

Mon-Fri at 4:00 AM on HD2
Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices, including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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StoryCorps
9:03 pm
Thu December 13, 2012

For Man With Amnesia, Love Repeats Itself

Jeff Ingram, 46, suffers from a rare condition that wipes his memory. Whenever he has an attack, his wife, Penny, fears he won't regain his love for her.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Mon December 17, 2012 8:25 am

Forty-six-year-old Jeff Ingram has a rare type of amnesia called dissociative fugue. When he has an attack, his memory is wiped clean and he doesn't remember who he is or where he's from.

To chronicle their memories in case he forgets again, Jeff and his wife, Penny, came to StoryCorps in Olympia, Wash.

"You and I were talking on the phone," Penny recalls. "You said, 'Well, I have a medical condition that I probably should share with you.' "

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Europe
6:25 am
Thu December 13, 2012

Botched Fresco Restorer Sells Original Work

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 8:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Remember Cecilia Gimenez? She's the 80-year-old Spanish woman who gained fame for her restoration of a 19th century fresco of Jesus. The botched restoration became quite a sensation. Some describe it as looking more like a monkey. Well, now Gimenez is selling some original work. It's a painting of a house in her hometown. It's on eBay, with bidding at more than $800. It makes you wonder if that Jesus restoration was bad art or good business. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:19 am
Thu December 13, 2012

If You Can't Beat Them, Copy Them

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 8:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Kristina Green knew she couldn't trump her next door neighbor's elaborate Christmas light display, so the Maricopa, Arizona woman decided to have some fun. Now pictured on her Facebook page is her neighbor's house covered, from driveway to roof, in 16,000 lights. And Green's house? It features a display of just 900 lights above her garage arranged to spell out the word ditto with an arrow pointing next door. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Europe
6:03 am
Thu December 13, 2012

A New Tale By Hans Christian Andersen

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 8:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Now to a writer whose exact words may not be remembered, but whose stories have come down through the ages. Scholars in Denmark believe they have found a new tale by Hans Christian Andersen. It's a short story called "The Tallow Candle."

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

A Danish newspaper says it was discovered in a storage box near Andersen's hometown. Experts believe he wrote it as a young teenager in the 1820s.

NPR Story
3:53 am
Thu December 13, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 8:03 am

CALM is an acronym for a new law that takes effect Thursday. It stands for the Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation Act, and it means you won't have to jump for your TV remote the second commercials air. The law says the volume of commercials needs to be the same as the programs they're coming out of.

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