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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices, including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Law
6:03 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Justice Department Downplays Hate Crime Law Expectation

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 6:53 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Wednesday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Nearly three years ago, Congress passed a federal hate crime law. It makes it illegal to target victims because of their race, religion or sexual orientation. The law drew protests from some Republican lawmakers and religious groups, who said it threatened their free speech rights. And the law has been used sparingly.

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Middle East
6:03 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Presidential Election Protest In Egypt Turns Deadly

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 6:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Vast as they are, the interrelated problems of Afghanistan, Pakistan and al-Qaida are only some of the problems the president faces - and that will be faced by whoever wins this fall's election. Egypt is preparing for a presidential election of its own, the first since a revolution toppled President Hosni Mubarak. And today, a protest related to that election led to deadly violence.

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Business
6:03 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Pfizer Settles Suit Involving Celebrex

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Pfizer, one of the worlds largest drug companies, will pay Brigham Young University nearly half a billion dollars to settle a patent related lawsuit involving the company's blockbuster painkiller Celebrex.

NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports, the settlement comes as the case was about to go to trial.

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NPR Story
5:37 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Occupy Protesters Mark May Day

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 6:48 am

The Occupy protest movement was out in force Tuesday. May 1 is traditionally a day for labor demonstrations. For the most part, the demonstrations were noisy and theatrical but restrained.

NPR Story
5:37 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Task Force Evaluates Consequences Of Stand Your Ground Law

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 6:39 am

The group was convened by Florida's governor and legislative leaders. The move comes after Trayvon Martin, an unarmed teen, was shot to death by neighborhood watch captain George Zimmerman. Since the law's passage in 2005, there's been growing concern about the law among police, prosecutors and judges.

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