Morning Edition on KCCU

Mon-Fri at 5:00 AM
Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne
Cynthia Sosa

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices, including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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NPR Story
3:27 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Egyptian Military Pushes Ahead With New Constitution Plans

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 7:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. In Egypt, the interim president and the generals who brought him to power are pushing ahead with what they say is a plan for a new constitution and elections. This is supposed to be a transition to some kind of real civilian rule. But it's already raising a lot of doubts about the intentions of the military. We've reached NPR's Leila Fadel in Cairo for the latest. Leila, good morning.

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Sweetness And Light
9:03 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Football Needs A Guardian, Not A CEO

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell speaks during a news conference at the NFL football spring meetings in Boston two months ago. Can he save our American sport from becoming a gladiator game?
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 7:03 am

Aaron Hernandez, who appears to be a monster, can no more be held up as representative of football than can Oscar Pistorius be fairly presented as an archetype of track and field.

But still, Hernandez does become a culminating figure. The sport is simply more and more identified with violence, both in its inherent nature and in its savage personnel.

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Around the Nation
7:17 am
Tue July 9, 2013

NTSB Investigators To Talk More To Cockpit Crew

For the latest developments in the investigation into the crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco, Renee Montagne talks to the head of the National Transportation Safety Board Deborah Hersman. Of the four pilots, investigators have only talked to two so far. More interviews will be conducted Tuesday.

Europe
6:28 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Mr. Darcy Statue Emerges From Hyde Park's Serpentine Lake

The 12-foot statue embodies the character played by Colin Firth in the BBC adaption of Pride and Prejudice. Brits recently ranked his spontaneous swim the most memorable TV drama moment.

Around the Nation
6:23 am
Tue July 9, 2013

The Family That Spits Together, Stays Together

The 40th Annual International Cherry Pit Spitting Championship was just held in Michigan. Matt Krause won when a pit flew nearly 42 feet. His brother Brian has won nine times, and his dad has won the title 15 times.

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