Morning Edition on KCCU

Mon-Fri at 5:00 AM
Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne
Cynthia Sosa

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices, including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Shots - Health News
2:20 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Myths And Stigma Stoke TB Epidemic In Tajikistan

Nurse Tina Martin checks on Orion Qurbonaliev, 4, who has tuberculosis. Orion's grandmother, Kholbibi Abdulloeva, also has TB.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 9:51 am

Four-year-old Orion Qurbonaliev is lucky to be alive. Just last February, the little boy was lying comatose in the tuberculosis ward of a hospital in southern Tajikistan. The bacteria had spread to his spine and paralyzed the right side of his body. He was severely dehydrated and malnourished.

The staff on the government-run ward had run out of options for treating Orion. "They just left this kid to die," says Tina Martin, a nurse with Doctors Without Borders.

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World
6:12 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Jennifer Lopez Sorry For Appearance In Turkmenistan

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 6:19 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Jennifer Lopez says she's sorry for singing "Happy Birthday" to the president of Turkmenistan. The country's known for being repressive. Human rights groups say government critics can be tortured or thrown in jail. A publicist says Lopez didn't know any of that when she put on a traditional Turkmen dress to serenade the president. At one point, Lopez's choreographer tweeted: I wonder where all my Turkmenistan followers are. Guess he didn't realize that Twitter is banned in the country.

Around the Nation
6:12 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Study: Americans Want To Be Informed About News Stories

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 6:19 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne, with news about the news. A new study finds 50 percent of Americans would rather know more about current events than fashion, sports or celebrity. So much so that one in three admitted pretending to know about a news story to impress someone. And, knowledgeable or not, 70 percent said they'll find any opportunity to argue about the news regardless of topic, though the favorite choice is politics.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Afghanistan
3:39 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Afghanistan's Next Generation Wants To Hold Taliban Accountable

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 11:28 am

NATO troops pull out of Afghanistan by the end of 2014, leaving some Afghans concerned about security. The withdrawal of foreign troops also opens up multiple chances for a successful democracy. A new generation is emerging in Afghanistan that is more educated, more connected with the world and more hopeful about the future than previous generations. Renee Montagne talks to with Shaharzad Akbar, chairperson for Afghanistan 1400; and Haseeb Humayoon, founding partner and director of QARA Consulting.

Middle East
3:39 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Kerry Believes Mideast Peace Talks 'Could Be Within Reach'

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 7:15 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Henry Kissinger as Secretary of State in the 1970s made the term shuttle diplomacy famous in the Middle East. Some of his successors used the same strategy, but it had been a while. Well, now it's John Kerry's turn. He emerged yesterday from long separate sessions with Palestinian and Israeli officials, saying the start of peace negotiations could be within reach. NPR's Emily Harris reports.

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