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Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne
Cynthia Sosa

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices, including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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NPR Story
3:47 am
Tue June 26, 2012

How Will Immigration Ruling Effect Other States?

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 11:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Alabama, a similar but tougher immigration law faces its own legal challenge. That case had been on hold, pending a ruling on the Arizona law. Andrew Yeager reports from member station WBHM.

ANDREW YEAGER, BYLINE: State Senator Scott Beason's phone has been ringing off the hook.

STATE SEN. SCOTT BEASON: Everybody calls and says, you know, have you read the opinion yet? And my answer is always no, because I've been on the phone constantly since. But no, I haven't...

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The Salt
2:35 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Fancy Names Can Fool Wine Geeks Into Paying More For A Bottle

New York Winemaker Christopher Tracy and a bottle of his Blaufrankisch. The wine's difficult to pronounce name may attract oenophiles.
Charles Lane NPR

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 12:56 pm

Which costs more, a bottle of Fat Bastard or a Tselepou (TSe-le-po)? What about a Cupcake versus some other name that's difficult for Americans to pronounce? Turns out, when it comes to wine, research suggests that the name alone can affect how much consumers are willing to pay for it. But is it that easy to dupe an oenophile?

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Middle East
2:08 am
Tue June 26, 2012

As 'Hungry Season' Nears, Yemenis Struggle For Food

Displaced Yemenis receive food aid from the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights in the southern province of Abyan. While food is available in the country, many Yemenis cannot afford to buy it. About 10 million people are going hungry, aid groups say.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 11:32 am

Yemen has long struggled as one of the least developed countries in the world. But now, after a year of protest and unrest that saw the country's longtime dictator step down, the situation for millions of Yemenis is dire.

Aid groups say some 10 million people are now without enough food to eat, and more than 200,000 children face life-threatening levels of malnutrition.

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World
2:07 am
Tue June 26, 2012

As NATO Draws Down, Afghans Fear A Brain Drain

International aid has poured into Afghanistan in recent years, but it is expected to fall sharply as NATO forces pull out. That will place great strains on the economy, and may lead skilled Afghans to leave if they can't find work. Here, street children in Kabul collect food from an aid group.
Dar Yasin AP

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 9:37 am

As NATO troops leave Afghanistan, there will also be a decline in aid money that has flooded the country over the past decade and created hundreds of thousands of jobs funded by donor money.

That means fewer jobs for Afghans, and skilled Afghans may be tempted to leave the country as part of a brain drain that could further weaken a fragile state.

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Business
2:05 am
Tue June 26, 2012

What's A Taxi Ride Worth? You Set The Price

Eric Hagen charges people only what they can afford in his Recession Ride Taxi in Burlington, Vt.
Kirk Carapezza for NPR

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 12:07 pm

In a recession, watching the meter on a taxi tick higher and higher can be distressing. But in Burlington, Vt., the Recession Ride Taxi lets customers set their own price.

Eric Hagen is a Wall Street banker-turned-cab-driver whose one-man "pay-what-you-want" taxi service has accrued dozens of faithful customers.

'I'd Be Walking'

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